What’s Wrong with the World

The men signed of the cross of Christ go gaily in the dark.

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What’s Wrong with the World is dedicated to the defense of what remains of Christendom, the civilization made by the men of the Cross of Christ. Athwart two hostile Powers we stand: the Jihad and Liberalism...read more

Recent Comments

Against the debasement of the language

Comment posted by Mike T on Apr 26, 06:48:

There's also a degree of immaturity and mockery in the way mancrush and bromance are used in conversation by the Millennials that you're missing, Dml. Generally they're used ironically or in jest. I've never met a peer who says soberly "this is my mancrush," except maybe a homosexual or two. ... [More]

Against the debasement of the language

Comment posted by DmL on Apr 26, 04:19:

Hmm... yeah, I suppose you're right. ... [More]

Against the debasement of the language

Comment posted by Lydia on Apr 25, 21:12:

I find it difficult to agree that a term like "bromance" will _normalize_ feelings of intense friendship between heterosexual men. After all, it couldn't be used for mocking if it were a good vehicle for treating something as perfectly normal. If anything, the term tends to take away dignity from those friendships. At a minimum it is a kind of diminutive. To say that something as glorious and profound as the love between Sam and Frodo in LOTR is a "bromance" is gag-worthy. If the idea is that people themse ... [More]

Against the debasement of the language

Comment posted by DmL on Apr 25, 20:57:

I know I commented on this before. (Love questions of the evolution of language.) I take your point about accuracy and a term like "starstruck" is infinitely more descriptive... But there is nothing like these man- and bro- words for mercilessly mocking my sissified progressive acquaintances. And even unironically, I still think that, in the general population, it helps to normalize these "romantic" (as in an older reading of the term "romance") feelings, which are quite normal feelings, amongst a group ... [More]

Against the debasement of the language

Comment posted by Lydia on Apr 25, 18:02:

A friend on Facebook made me chuckle by commenting that this post makes him realize just how much he hates the word "mancave." I suppose that one's relatively harmless, but it's still extremely ugly. Besides, the word "study" or "den" works just as well. In fact, wasn't that cavelike connotation supposed to be the point of "den"? :-) ... [More]

Against the debasement of the language

Comment posted by Tony on Apr 25, 18:01:

I must lead a sheltered life. Haven't even heard of those, and I don't want them explained! ... [More]

Against the debasement of the language

Comment posted by Mike T on Apr 25, 15:46:

Let's cut to the chance. Don't use any neologism than merges "man" with another word. Mansplain, manspreading, etc. They're all left-wing words that either allow men their little zone of masculinity or are used by feminists and their fellow travelers to simultaneously debase the language and attack masculinity. ... [More]

Against the debasement of the language

Comment posted by Titus on Apr 25, 15:14:

Lydia, you forgot (3): "People should not use these words because they are crass neologisms that cut both speaker and listener off from the expressive depths that already exist in the English language, if people would put down the phone and actually learn to speak." Trying to debate the precise connotation of a made-up word of that type is an unnecessary fool's errand. ... [More]

Against the debasement of the language

Comment posted by Tony on Apr 25, 14:51:

because his fan-like feelings and behavior are excessive. And we already have a word for "fan-like" feelings: "fan". Which, of course, comes from "fanatic", and implies the excess right in the word. Mancrush of course carries the connotations of the word "crush", which has been used for more than a half century for strong feelings of affection + romantic interest from afar, i.e. without any connotation of either acting on the feeling or expecting any return on the feeling. Before recently, heterosexua ... [More]

Against the debasement of the language

Comment posted by Lydia on Apr 25, 14:05:

I've also heard "mancrush" used in the following context: "So-and-so has a mancrush on Apologist X. He was so excited to get to spend some time with him that he took a picture of his car and posted it on Facebook, because he just thought it was so cool to get a chance to take a picture of his car." Now, that is classic fan-like behavior. What is being alleged there is that the guy is acting like a star-struck fan with respect to Apologist X. In fact, the information about taking a picture of the car was us ... [More]

Against the debasement of the language

Comment posted by Lydia on Apr 25, 13:55:

Actually, I have no idea what "erotic but nonsexual" even means. Perhaps physical admiration? Wanting to be as good-looking or (if a woman) as beautiful as the other person? And I have _definitely_ seen "mancrush" used for admiration as of a younger scholar for an older. I once saw someone say that he has a "mancrush" on an elderly Christian philosopher. I defy anyone to say that was an erotic feeling. This was a normal, heterosexual guy making the comment. It was just meant as a self-deprecating, humorou ... [More]

Against the debasement of the language

Comment posted by Aaron Gross on Apr 25, 12:59:

I agree that "bromance" is ugly, but "mancrush" doesn't sound ugly to me. I can't explain objectively why one's ugly and the other isn't, but that's how the words sound to me. But I think you're making a mistake because you yourself aren't using words precisely enough. You move from "romantic" to "(homo)sexual" to "erotic" as if the three were interchangeable. They're not. I think "mancrush" as used originally is erotic but not sexual or romantic. The "slight grin" is because it's taken from usage that is ... [More]

How is this legally possible?

Comment posted by Tony on Apr 24, 08:13:

Mike, that seems to be right. It is, really, what accountability relates to: it is not enough to 'have a rule' about something for people to tend toward right behavior, there has to be some sort of expectation that malfeasance will be brought to account. Socially, once we lose any expectation that wrong-doing will be brought to account in the next life (the atheists and agnostics don't even think there is a next life, the New Agers don't believe it means anything like being held to account, and even 60% ... [More]

How is this legally possible?

Comment posted by Mike T on Apr 24, 07:34:

A good case can be made that when the authorities know that the line has to be pushed exceedingly far to get even civil disobedience, human nature will make it easier for them to do wrong. That's true of bullies, but true of most people to some degree. ... [More]

How is this legally possible?

Comment posted by Bedarz Iliaci on Apr 24, 00:18:

Clearly some sort of civil disobedience is called for. No people have ever gone to the extent of some Catholic dogmatists for whom authority is never to be flouted unless it asks us to do something intrinsically wrong. Imagine being a Jew in Berlin 1936. The authorities forbid you to walk on sidewalk. Are you morally obliged to obey? ... [More]

It don't even make good nonsense

Comment posted by JB on Apr 23, 12:19:

No worries, I knew it was borderline. ... [More]

It don't even make good nonsense

Comment posted by Lydia on Apr 23, 12:12:

Sorry, I realize the comment I just deleted was well-intentioned as a reply to WW's nonsense, but I had to delete it anyway. I'm sure the writer of the comment will understand. ... [More]

It don't even make good nonsense

Comment posted by JB on Apr 23, 11:42:

I shouldn't mention this, I really shouldn't, but if whirlwinder's premise is correct. [Yes, sorry, you really shouldn't mention it. LM] ... [More]

It don't even make good nonsense

Comment posted by Lydia on Apr 23, 09:32:

Homosexual relationships certainly aren't marriage and certainly cannot be consummated in the eyes of God. Our nation certainly needs God's help. But your comment shows that you are a real weirdo, and your theory concerning real marriage is not supported by...anything, really. So please, refrain. I sometimes wonder how W4 manages to attract such totally bizarre comments from (in some sense) "the right." I will do my part to make really wacky comments from that side of the political spectrum unwelcome on ... [More]

Fractional Reserve Creation of New Money

Comment posted by Tony on Apr 23, 07:10:

If you think of a spectrum with pure medium of exchange on one end (the left end) and pure wealth asset on the other end (the right end) then as you move along the spectrum from left to right you're able to store value for progressively longer periods of time. And I think it is debatable whether this is a good way to analyze money / currency. There are some assumptions built into this framework that I am just not comfortable with as being true or necessarily true. I don't know that we should think of "mo ... [More]

How is this legally possible?

Comment posted by Mike T on Apr 23, 06:55:

Tony, No, cops and prosecutors genuinely don't. Why? Consider this case. Cop tells 19 year old teacher in training to leave a party. She does. He runs over to her car, jumps on the hood and shoots her 4 times in the chest. I believe he's already been cleared because he was "afeered fur muh life." What does the "court of public opinion" matter when it never amounts to more than a nasty glance at the grocery store. Imagine instead, her father showed up at the station, shot him dead in front of his superiors ... [More]

It don't even make good nonsense

Comment posted by whirlwinder on Apr 22, 23:36:

God, looking down on this mess, must be weeping. Marriage, between a man and a woman, is a covenant and there can be no covenant without the shedding of blood, and this occurs when [edited LM] the new marriage is consummated. What ever these vile people are doing cannot be called marriage since there cannot be the shedding of blood as God has intended for marriage. These unions or what ever they may be called are unholy and fly in the face of everything that holds our society together. God help us. ... [More]

How is this legally possible?

Comment posted by Boreas on Apr 22, 21:59:

What is this craziness? How is such a law remotely legally possible? Why has it not been struck down long ago as unconstitutional? In all seriousness, what does it matter in this lawless country? Anymore, it seems like everything is permitted so long as it suits the interests of the left. Those of us who think/believe/live differently have been checkmated. ... [More]

How is this legally possible?

Comment posted by Tony on Apr 22, 21:16:

Yeah, I have to I agree with Mike on that. For one, I would NOT obey such orders (to the extent I could avoid being caught), it's not a just law and should not be given obedience. Second, I seriously doubt that it would stand up to scrutiny at some federal venue, though I don't know where. Thirdly, don't these people fear the crud eventually "getting out" and then having to deal with the court of public opinion as well as legally being fried to a crisp? ... [More]

Fractional Reserve Creation of New Money

Comment posted by Tony on Apr 22, 19:21:

Yes, my view is that gold coin for most of the history of gold coin was used as tradeable wealth, not as medium of exchange or currency. Andrew, I would debate this point. It seems to me that for a large part of the historical record, until about 700 BC, gold in the form of ingots and rings and bracelets and such were "tradeable wealth". When the Lydians invented coinage, though, is when I think a switch was flipped. When you have gold packaged into small, uniform, labeled (as it were) amounts, you star ... [More]

Fractional Reserve Creation of New Money

Comment posted by Tony on Apr 22, 19:03:

Titus, I would love it if you would spell out details that we need to refine the picture of fractional reserve lending. There are, obviously, different varieties and species of bailment, so maybe you could expand on that? However, in reading through a large number of sites and articles describing loans, lending, banking, and fractional reserve banking, I did not come across the explicit term "bailment", so I did not know the term was being used. However, I am very familiar with the CONCEPT, as I deal w ... [More]

How is this legally possible?

Comment posted by Mike T on Apr 22, 15:29:

Well, one thing you could do is go to an attorney and say "hypothetically this, hypothetically that and would I have a case in federal court?" If your attorney files in federal court and the state promptly arrests you, that would likely get the judge to immediately bring the hammer down on the John Doe law since it is a law effectively attempting to override access to the federal courts but from the state level. ... [More]

How is this legally possible?

Comment posted by Lydia on Apr 22, 14:33:

Either the "in some form" thing is flexible, or it's always been outrageous. After all, if you are not allowed to talk to a lawyer, then the state can at least attempt to forbid you from bringing a color of law suit in federal court, since to do so you would need to disclose to a lawyer (at least) and to a federal court what had been done to you. ... [More]

How is this legally possible?

Comment posted by Mike T on Apr 22, 13:49:

According to this, in some form, it's been on the books since the territorial days of Wisconsin. Still not an excuse, but this is precisely the sort of thing that Republicans should be hounded on until they draft a law to repeal. If Walker gets the nomination, he should should issue a warning to the Wisconsin law enforcement establishment, Chisholm in particular, and tell them that if elected President he's going to bring the full machinery of the DoJ down on their heads with criminal sanctions. ... [More]

Fractional Reserve Creation of New Money

Comment posted by Andrew E. on Apr 22, 12:40:

Andrew, let us, for the moment, accept that paper-backed currency obscures something. How is actual metal coin less transparent than fiat money? When you say "currency is not wealth" that obviously true for fiat money. It obviously WAS NOT true of coin money in gold and silver - at least, it was not true of coin money when coin money was first used, by definition. Are you suggesting that coin money started out as wealth and along the way stopped being wealth? Yes, my view is that gold coin for most of th ... [More]

How is this legally possible?

Comment posted by Lydia on Apr 22, 12:15:

Allegedly, it was something to do with the mafia in the history. But still, there is no justification. The worst, most murderous mafia don should not be silenced when talking to his lawyer. ... [More]

How is this legally possible?

Comment posted by Respectabiggle on Apr 22, 12:13:

How is such a law remotely legally possible? Not knowing the history here, but I'm going to guess "War on Drugs". ... [More]

Fractional Reserve Creation of New Money

Comment posted by Lydia on Apr 22, 12:08:

Mind you, I do understand that the bank doesn't strictly do this "at will," because the bank is now "on the hook" for the new funds created, which may at some point be demanded in currency--e.g., by another bank. This is why banks don't just lend out money willy-nilly and are not strictly speaking creating ex nihilo. They are putting a potential burden on their own resources by creating/lending these funds. But the fact remains that, in the act of lending while maintaining their obligations to the original ... [More]

How is this legally possible?

Comment posted by Mike T on Apr 22, 11:47:

Why has it not been struck down long ago as unconstitutional? A federal judge recently ruled that there was no 3rd amendment violation in a team of heavily armed cops storming into someone's house to use it as a base of operations to gather intel on a domestic abuse case. This is the same federal judiciary that gave us Kelo and that only recently realized that for about 150 years the 2nd amendment was the only part of the bill of rights that had never, not once, been incorporated under the 14th amendment. ... [More]

Fractional Reserve Creation of New Money

Comment posted by Lydia on Apr 22, 11:40:

It's not a new concept, but when they make a loan, they do create a new deposit account without your making a deposit. That new deposit account is a requirement for the bank to render up funds when called upon. The "funds" newly created and placed in that account can be used to buy whatever you have been authorized to buy. If it's a home mortgage, they go right out to the seller of the house. If it's a HELOC, you progressively use them to buy whatever you want. HELOCs even come with a stack of checks to all ... [More]

Fractional Reserve Creation of New Money

Comment posted by Titus on Apr 22, 11:26:

There are already 167 comments on this page. No one has pointed out that Tony's original post fails to distinguish between a bailment and a loan and that bank deposits are not bailments, but loans to the bank. (This is why, incidentally, banks call it a "credit," rather than a "debit," when money goes into your account, since it's money they owe you, not your money they're holding for you. The terminology is looking at it from their perspective, not yours.) At least, nobody has pointed it out using the corr ... [More]

Fractional Reserve Creation of New Money

Comment posted by Tony on Apr 22, 05:14:

I may be mistaken but wasn't the major disagreement in this thread was on the very political question of the attitude of sovereign to the fiat money--plaything of the sovereign etc etc. Bedarz, in spite of the knuckleheaded insistence of certain parties to mold the discussion on topics they wanted to discuss whether this thread was about that or not, the CENTRAL topic of this thread is fractional reserve banking (FRB), and what follows from that. I am willing to let side issues come in, but not at the exp ... [More]

Fractional Reserve Creation of New Money

Comment posted by Tony on Apr 22, 05:10:

Paper fiat currency is more intuitively a medium of exchange and not a store of value. And since currency is not wealth, this is more transparent. Andrew, let us, for the moment, accept that paper-backed currency obscures something. How is actual metal coin less transparent than fiat money? When you say "currency is not wealth" that obviously true for fiat money. It obviously WAS NOT true of coin money in gold and silver - at least, it was not true of coin money when coin money was first used, by defin ... [More]

Fractional Reserve Creation of New Money

Comment posted by Bedarz Iliaci on Apr 22, 00:41:

Andrew E, Isn't it somewhat contradictory to extol fiat currency for transparency and honesty and then talk of govt finances as essentially opaque. Are govt finances essentially opaque or is their opacity a function of fiat money? Or is opacity a function of the complex nature of modern economy? Lydia and others pointed about that fiat money allows sovereign to commit fraud on the citizens and to redistribute the wealth away to more connected first receivers of the newly created money. Does it look like ... [More]

Fractional Reserve Creation of New Money

Comment posted by Bedarz Iliaci on Apr 22, 00:29:

this thread is not centrally about politics I may be mistaken but wasn't the major disagreement in this thread was on the very political question of the attitude of sovereign to the fiat money--plaything of the sovereign etc etc. As I see it, Zippy would only admit perspective of an investor towards currency and banking questions and all efforts to validate the perspective of a citizen were dismissed by him. ... [More]