What’s Wrong with the World

The men signed of the cross of Christ go gaily in the dark.

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What’s Wrong with the World is dedicated to the defense of what remains of Christendom, the civilization made by the men of the Cross of Christ. Athwart two hostile Powers we stand: the Jihad and Liberalism...read more

Recent Comments

People are free, not driven

Comment posted by Urban II on Aug 22, 01:02:

When white people are viciously attacked on a daily basis it makes perfect sense why white men would be "tempted" to be part of a movement that defends white men. The Republican establishment isn't willing to, so people have to turn to a movement that will. ... [More]

Review of Easter Enigma by John Wenham

Comment posted by Tony on Aug 21, 17:33:

If they are done as a sacramental rite I would say they are not pointless. Fair enough. I would like to know more detail about how oils were used both for the living and the dead. ... [More]

Review of Easter Enigma by John Wenham

Comment posted by Tony on Aug 21, 17:30:

Secondly, it isn't clear why a sign of love and affection would, on its own, be worthy of memorializing her for eternity. Jesus does not say that her act is "worthy" of being memorialized forever, he says that it WILL be remembered. In fact, it was remembered and written down at least in part precisely because Jesus made a point of the event, saying it will be remembered. If he had not made issue of it being remembered, would the gospel writers have thought to include it? Note something a little jarring ... [More]

Review of Easter Enigma by John Wenham

Comment posted by Step2 on Aug 21, 16:19:

Tony, I assume for my position merely that anointing someone with oil would have been a sign of love and affection. The more costly the oil, the greater the sign. It seemed to me like you were saying that God inspired Mary to do it for the reason Jesus stated, even if that reason was unbeknownst to her. I can't tell if you are backtracking on that or what. Secondly, it isn't clear why a sign of love and affection would, on its own, be worthy of memorializing her for eternity. Even if her affection was e ... [More]

People are free, not driven

Comment posted by Lydia on Aug 21, 12:56:

Yes, "tempted" is definitely a better word. And that allows us to see the same temptation on multiple sides, because if one isn't driven but rather tempted, then it's much less predictable which way the temptation will fall for a given person. To some extent it depends on what one is focusing on. If one is previously conservative and is focusing only on the demonization from the left, then one might look around and allow oneself to get tangled up with a community of alt-rightists. If one is focusing only on ... [More]

People are free, not driven

Comment posted by Sage McLaughlin on Aug 21, 08:31:

Lydia, I agree with your objection to the word "driven," as though alt-rightists are cattle being "driven" this way and that. It's easy to see the problem with this whenever I stop to consider that many people--you, for one--have more cause for frustration with people like Moore than your typical alt-rightist does. A better word than driven might be tempted. People frequently are, of course, tempted to take refuge in crankish political communities for all sorts of reasons, and I've been predicting for a ... [More]

People are free, not driven

Comment posted by Lydia on Aug 20, 22:18:

I write what I feel like writing, when I feel like it, mostly on whim. That's blogging, at least as I choose to do it. The rest of the time I'm living a life and working on other things that I consider worthwhile. I do not blog to please you or to mirror what you think my priorities should be in blogging, or, for that matter, the priorities of any other human being on God's green earth. The only reason your IP hasn't been banned yet is because your drive-by trolling is thus far occasional, but it is not app ... [More]

People are free, not driven

Comment posted by Steve Burton on Aug 20, 22:11:

Lydia, did you by any chance pay any attention to what went down in Boston, yesterday? 40,000 lefties in futile search of a Nazi to beat up? The unjust firing of James Damore totally forgotten? ... [More]

Review of Easter Enigma by John Wenham

Comment posted by Tony on Aug 20, 18:09:

More importantly I don't see how your claim doesn't thoroughly undermine your own argument. If Mary's act for the reason stated by Jesus was inappropriate, it remains inappropriate even if it was inspired by God. I assume for my position merely that anointing someone with oil would have been a sign of love and affection. The more costly the oil, the greater the sign. Mark and John both record Mary being alone in her encounter at the tomb Not quite accurate: Mark clearly indicates Mary was not alone, ... [More]

Review of Easter Enigma by John Wenham

Comment posted by Step2 on Aug 20, 15:41:

Tony, Her actual experience at the tomb is completely irrelevant to whether she expected to find Jesus resurrected. If she did, taking the spices is unexplainable. 1. Only Luke records a group of women preparing and then bringing spices and ointments, Mary included among them. It is not stated the extent, if any, to which Mary was involved in the preparation or carrying. Even if she was significantly involved it doesn't require that Mary expected to find Jesus dead, it only means she went along with the ... [More]

Review of Easter Enigma by John Wenham

Comment posted by Lydia on Aug 20, 13:44:

I usually don't bother to answer Ed Babinski, as it is a waste of time. His biases are so huge that they blot out the sun and are just not worth replying to. In discussing a culture in which heavily spiced perfumes actually were pretty important, it's flat silly to insinuate that multiple stories involving heavily spiced perfumes of different kinds must contain inventions because, I dunno, there couldn't have been that much perfume around and people using it to honor someone in different times and contexts. ... [More]

Review of Easter Enigma by John Wenham

Comment posted by David Madison on Aug 20, 02:45:

Mr Babinski, I won't bother to address all the details of your comment, but one point is worth highlighting. You say that stories about Jesus being anointed serve a symbolic or theological purpose. You then assume - although you don't actually spell it out - that if a story about Jesus has a symbolic meaning, then it has been invented. You are not alone in doing this, of course. It might be said that you, and others like you, are applying the criteria of inauthenticity. You are “able” to detect false storie ... [More]

Review of Easter Enigma by John Wenham

Comment posted by Tony on Aug 19, 17:44:

1. Mary's only knowledge of a resurrection was that of Lazarus. 2. That event would have been the basis of her expectations for Jesus unless given specific contrary details. 3. Her experience at the tomb of Jesus was not similar in any significant way to the raising of Lazarus. 4. Therefore her belief, combined with her past experience, misled her expectations. Her actual experience at the tomb is completely irrelevant to whether she expected to find Jesus resurrected. If she did, taking the spices is une ... [More]

Review of Easter Enigma by John Wenham

Comment posted by Step2 on Aug 19, 15:50:

Tony, Some third option that I am unable to contrive? 1. Mary's only knowledge of a resurrection was that of Lazarus. 2. That event would have been the basis of her expectations for Jesus unless given specific contrary details. 3. Her experience at the tomb of Jesus was not similar in any significant way to the raising of Lazarus. 4. Therefore her belief, combined with her past experience, misled her expectations. To decide that it is intentionally omitting "relevant" information would require someth ... [More]

Review of Easter Enigma by John Wenham

Comment posted by edwardtbabinski on Aug 19, 14:13:

THE ANOINTING STORIES IN THE SYNOPTIC GOSPELS RAISE QUESTIONS CONCERNING THE HISTORICITY OF THE RAISING OF LAZARUS STORY IN THE FOURTH GOSPEL According to the Gospels Jesus was anointed with (or received) perfume numerous times in his life. Are all the tales true? Are any of them symbolic, legendary? At his birth Jesus allegedly received a visit from an unknown number of wealthy star gazers (was it two? three? more than three? Matthew does not say) who traveled far to deliver gifts of “frankincense and myr ... [More]

People are free, not driven

Comment posted by Tony on Aug 18, 22:37:

"Driven", huh? Well, maybe they got driven, but they had to get in the car on their own, and had to stay in the car while being driven to somewhere. Nobody can "drive you" to embrace error as if it were true (without actually falsifying data, at least). Your refusal to follow reason is your own, not theirs. Oh, did he mean that by "driving" evangelicals to the alt-right, he was giving them GOOD reasons to accept the alt-right? No? Then he was not giving evangelicals good reason to accept the alt-r ... [More]

Cowards, the Lot of Them

Comment posted by Tony on Aug 18, 17:30:

That's pretty funny. This link sheds more light on social science statistics, by a statistician: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C42AwvaZ-04 ... [More]

Review of Easter Enigma by John Wenham

Comment posted by Tony on Aug 18, 17:21:

I would say again it hinges on specific knowledge. Once more under the orthodox view, the belief considered generally would cause her to expect something very different from what she saw and heard. Nothing about the raising of Lazarus was similar to her experience at the tomb of Jesus. Unless she was given detailed knowledge her behavior was quite normal. Step2, I tried several times to understand what you are saying here, and I just can't. Are you saying Mary expected Jesus to be risen on the 3rd day? T ... [More]

Cowards, the Lot of Them

Comment posted by Lydia on Aug 18, 16:34:

This sort of thing ought to make us very wary of claims about neurophysiology and politics: http://www.nationalreview.com/corner/436424/presenting-one-most-humiliating-academic-mistakes-ever ... [More]

Cowards, the Lot of Them

Comment posted by The Masked Chicken on Aug 18, 15:50:

Tony, I would like to respond to your points, but my iPad was, literally, grabbed out of my hands this morning while I was reading the news at a picnic table near a building on campus. My access to the Internet is going to be limited for a while. The Chicken ... [More]

Cowards, the Lot of Them

Comment posted by Tony on Aug 18, 15:42:

Neurophysiology has discovered that there are neural correlates for extreme conservatism and extreme liberalism corresponding to the fight-or-flight response, with conservatives being more risk aversive and liberals being more risk takers or thrill seekers. It is there that one will find the greatest concentration of risk takers, of liberal, who subvert the natural order for the sake of being noticed. I have heard this idea mentioned several times in the last few months. I think it is bunk. At lea ... [More]

Cowards, the Lot of Them

Comment posted by Tony on Aug 18, 10:57:

MC, that is a very enlightening explanation of fear. Very thoughtful and developed. Couple ideas: The youth who were part of the Wars, essentially, has their fight-or-flight responses so sensitized that when they returned from the War, those senses stayed on. For some, it was the agony of shell shock, which we later renamed, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. For others, it was the thrill of progress, the daring to consider the unconsiderable. We were, after all, the victors. What could hurt us? I don' ... [More]

Review of Easter Enigma by John Wenham

Comment posted by Step2 on Aug 17, 15:47:

Tony, Let's adjust that: there was no such revelation THAT THEY SHARED WITH US. You could, but unlike Lydia who is looking for undesigned coincidences I am looking for undesigned discrepancies. I consider this passage to be one of those, a puzzle piece which doesn't fit with the larger picture. If we take seriously the idea the gospel writers were intentionally omitting relevant information then skepticism should be the default approach towards most everything they wrote. Furthermore, the reaction of t ... [More]

Cowards, the Lot of Them

Comment posted by The Masked Chicken on Aug 17, 11:43:

Not everyone starts out life as a coward. Little children are quite often fearless where old men will cower in fear. That is because children have a natural trust that old men often lack, but innocence can be stolen and one of the worst ways to loose innocence is through war. Every war causes men to be afraid, but the wars during the Twentieth-century were unlike any in the past. Battles that formerly took days to even get the combatants together and weeks to fight could now be decided in a matter minut ... [More]

Cowards, the Lot of Them

Comment posted by The Masked Chicken on Aug 17, 10:50:

Now, the virtue opposed to fear is fortitude and the vices connected to fear are daring and fearlessness (or recklessness). All rightly ordered conduct must be rational and there is a form of fear which is rational, but is better expressed as prudence. Thus, one may fear to stick one's hand in the fire, but it is better expressed as prudence, since prudence, "is the knowledge of what to seek and what to avoid." (ST. II.II Q 47). As both the definitions from Aquinas and Solomon show, fear, by contrast, is ... [More]

Cowards, the Lot of Them

Comment posted by The Masked Chicken on Aug 17, 09:20:

Tony, I did not mean to side-track the discussion on the subject of work, in general. It is a subject worthy of its own post, since there are issues of the loss of hope embedded in there. More and more I see young people with no sense of reality, either over estimating or under estimating what they can do and losing the striving for that excellence which is within their grasp. This is most painfully obvious with regards to the acquisition of the moral virtues, since that is a form of work. Since this i ... [More]

Cowards, the Lot of Them

Comment posted by Tony on Aug 16, 23:15:

Well, I don't think that Lydia or I were trying to assert what you are objecting to, here. Sorry if I misled you to mistake the point. A man should generally hope in the long run to attain a job that is at the same time (a) at least somewhat suited to his skills and capabilities, (b) in some measure suited to his temperament and preferences, and (c) pays him sufficiently for his vocation and station in life. This general kind of hope should also make him willing to WORK FOR that as a goal, work for the ... [More]

Cowards, the Lot of Them

Comment posted by Lydia on Aug 16, 23:13:

And when I say "people" I especially mean "men," who should be looking to be providers. I've found it interesting to see how often in a couple (not always, but often) the man is seeking some higher vocation while his wife works as a bank teller (or whatever) to support his search, put him through graduate school, etc. At the risk of overgeneralizing, my experience has been that women are more realistic about this kind of thing, perhaps because they are ultimately aiming to focus their vocation in their chil ... [More]

Cowards, the Lot of Them

Comment posted by Lydia on Aug 16, 23:09:

This notion of any job for any person (or close enough) reduces people to a uniformity that is dangerous to contemplate. I wouldn't endorse any job for any person. But I do endorse having a *much* more flexible notion of the jobs for which one is suited or potentially suited than is usual in the United States at this time. It's a bit like marriage. There's a whole range of ideas that from "You could be just as well-suited married to any person of the opposite sex, it doesn't matter, because it's all abou ... [More]

Cowards, the Lot of Them

Comment posted by The Masked Chicken on Aug 16, 21:58:

I am sorry, but the notion of working out of necessity, while needful for general living, is, at best, God's permissive will. I spent a lot of time not doing what I should have in life to have the scars to prove it. Why not, then, just take any job, since a job is a job? Yes, one must be grateful for having food on the table, but, again, people are not swappable parts. This notion of any job for any person (or close enough) reduces people to a uniformity that is dangerous to contemplate. I have done my ... [More]

Cowards, the Lot of Them

Comment posted by Lydia on Aug 16, 20:54:

but out of fear of the grit and grime and smell and (should you admit it) the poor social standing. An enormous part of our economic problem in the U.S. today is the low esteem in which "dirty jobs" (to channel Mike Rowe) are held. This social stigma affects well-intentioned parents, who then pass on these vain prejudices to their kids through stereotyping and shaming. A son is going to find it harder than it would be otherwise to take any satisfaction in a plumbing job (applying his mind to diagnosing an ... [More]

Review of Easter Enigma by John Wenham

Comment posted by Tony on Aug 16, 18:26:

Ah, now I get it. Jesus knew it (to which I agree 100%), and he might have shared it with Mary. True. Let me return to your prior comment for a sec: There was no such revelation [that his burial would be in a hurry] known to the writers of the gospels. Let's adjust that: there was no such revelation THAT THEY SHARED WITH US. They might not have chosen to write it up. There was lots they didn't say. However, the apostles (and through them the other gospel writers) had lots and lots of time to ... [More]

Review of Easter Enigma by John Wenham

Comment posted by Step2 on Aug 16, 18:06:

Tony, So, what process of thinking are you considering that represents her own reason for her to expressly buy burial oils and to use them on Jesus before he dies, without recognition that his burial would be hurried? I did not assume Mary didn't have such a recognition. Without delving into heterodox theories, under the orthodox view Jesus is the second person of the omniscient Trinity. Therefore there is no reason, none whatsoever, that Jesus would not have absolute detailed knowledge of his bodily dea ... [More]

Cowards, the Lot of Them

Comment posted by Tony on Aug 16, 18:02:

The idea of a dream job as a human right or as the normal situation and as the correct meaning of human vocation is, I believe, an artifact of the artificially wealthy world of the modern West and in that sense part of the artificiality that Tony's main post deplores. It would be absurd to suppose that all the things that have to be done in the world--roads that have to be paved, holes that have to be dug, fields that have to be plowed, plumbing that has to be fixed, books that have to be balanced--are goin ... [More]

Cowards, the Lot of Them

Comment posted by Tony on Aug 16, 17:40:

Steve, teaching is indeed a calling, not just a job. And anyone who is called to teach "for a living" ought to love it more than "just a job". Nevertheless: normally a full-time teacher - especially a teacher of Ethics - must be professional enough and responsible enough to justify compensation coordinate with raising a family. That is to say, you wouldn't want to be employing someone who all day is in charge of young persons, and in charge of forming their minds (to some extent), and who is held to ... [More]

Cowards, the Lot of Them

Comment posted by Steve Burton on Aug 16, 16:40:

Any born teacher worth his salt is willing to teach for little, if anything, more than his basic upkeep. I myself teach a course on Ethical Theory to a very mixed bag of students at a little Jesuit school right in the middle of flyover country. And I do it for $2550 per class. And it's the best Ethics course in the world today. ... [More]

Cowards, the Lot of Them

Comment posted by Tony on Aug 16, 13:19:

And for just a quick contrary note: when I was an adjunct teacher (lo these many years ago), I gave a kid a D on a class he need a C on for credit for his degree. (Never mind that it was remedial - 8th grade - Math, and it was utterly unconscionable for a university department to count it as math credit for a degree). Not only did the kid argue with me about the grade when he bombed the final exam and had hardly shown up for class, something like SIX YEARS LATER the administration tracked me down to try ... [More]

Cowards, the Lot of Them

Comment posted by Tony on Aug 16, 13:05:

I am not sure you understand the current situation in higher education. More and more professor positions are part-time. Tenure is going away. Chicken, you are right that I was not considering the situation of adjunct professors. Which is kind of funny, since I have done a stint or two myself - odd job extra income for a semester here and there. Lydia is at least partly right about who is in that category for more than a few semesters. But regardless of the extent to which the full-time tenured profes ... [More]

Cowards, the Lot of Them

Comment posted by DeGaulle on Aug 16, 12:57:

Chicken, there are nice, very rich people, like Richard Branson among others, who are dead keen to give us free money in order to make ends meet. Why does it strike me that this money will not come without preconditions? In order to eat you will have to sign up to agreeing to same-sex 'marriage', to use countless novel 'gender' pronouns and much other evil insanity. ... [More]

Cowards, the Lot of Them

Comment posted by Lydia on Aug 16, 12:48:

finding something else to do to make ends meet is going to become a lot harder for many people, very soon, and it is all greed. I'm afraid this is taking us OT from Tony's post, but I can't *in general* agree that the need for people to do things that they don't love is "all greed." I can speak more to the educational field than to the musical field, but IMO the rise in teaching jobs was largely an artificial economic bubble, fueled by federal student loans and hence exploiting students' and their parents' ... [More]