What’s Wrong with the World

The men signed of the cross of Christ go gaily in the dark.

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What’s Wrong with the World is dedicated to the defense of what remains of Christendom, the civilization made by the men of the Cross of Christ. Athwart two hostile Powers we stand: the Jihad and Liberalism...read more

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Part III of a review of John H. Walton's The Lost World of Adam and Eve

Comment posted by Bedarz Iliaci on Mar 31, 05:28:

The point that I am trying to make is 1) Concordism in the sense of trying to match Genesis 1 text with current science (or non-science) is unproductive except for puzzles which can be solved scientifically or extra-scientifically (as your suggestion of the sun that was caused to appear visible on Day 4.). What spiritual insights are led to by these kind of puzzle-solving? 2) Do you maintain that Genesis 1 provides the "How" of creation? and that too in literal, non-metaphoric language? 3) The influence ... [More]

Zippy Catholic on Usury

Comment posted by Bedarz Iliaci on Mar 30, 23:43:

Far from being widely understood, I would say that probably 99 persons out of 100 have never heard of fractional reserve banking and being explained would intuitively call it fraudulent. Unlike usury, which as explained by you, has very little real-life implications-- there might be plenty of usury going, but nobody is incurring the sin of usury. Since credit card companies and home loan companies are not persons, they can't sin and the credit card users are innocent victims. While, fractional reserve ... [More]

Choice devours itself: Depressed bi-polar patients eligible for Belgian suicide

Comment posted by MarcAnthony on Mar 30, 22:46:

Belgium is a terrifying place. I stopped being surprised by them when they gave children the write to override their parents in regard to euthanasia. ... [More]

Brazilian Magnates Inflict Dreadful Austerity on American Workers

Comment posted by al on Mar 30, 21:43:

"And there is at least a chance that all this activity will supply us — humble pupils at the School of Experience — with useful knowledge by which we might enrich the discussion of public finances, austerity, and the health of our political economy." I believe an engineer turned politician implemented zero-based budgeting when he was Governor of Georgia and then President. The next president found it more useful to ignore it and the resulting deficits. ... [More]

The End of Diversity

Comment posted by James Waldrop on Mar 30, 18:36:

"The same author also wrote elsewhere - and I paraphrase - that a traditional Christian order fosters religious unity and cultural diversity, while modern societies demand cultural uniformity and religious diversity." I remember reading the article you are referring to, but I cannot recall the name. Can you provide with a link to the article, or do you remember the name? ... [More]

Brazilian Magnates Inflict Dreadful Austerity on American Workers

Comment posted by John S. on Mar 30, 17:01:

Not necessarily, Tony. I have experience with zero-based budgeting that included multi-year development projects. At the manager budget level, however far up it makes sense, you might build out two or three year budgets, understanding that you have to justify your budget request, not on the basis that last year I had $10 million so this year I get $10.5 million, but on the basis that each dollar I am requesting this year has a specific intended purpose and if my project budgets are $10 million this year, ... [More]

Choice Devours Itself: So much for making your wishes known

Comment posted by Mike T on Mar 30, 14:07:

I wasn't asserting any mitigation or support for the actions of the adult welfare/family service agents. I was saying that if the state was putting her up in the nursing home, the family has no moral claim on the state to force them to continue to pay unless she's there because of state malfeasance or she was guaranteed certain benefits for public service. As I said, the actions of the state's adult welfare agents was morally nonsensical. All of that said, conservatives need to wake up and start demanding ... [More]

Part II of a Review of John H. Walton's The Lost World of Adam and Eve

Comment posted by steve hays on Mar 30, 13:30:

The locus classicus for gaps in the genealogies was published by William Henry Green in the 19C. That's readily available on the internet. For instance: http://www.reasons.org/articles/are-there-gaps-in-the-biblical-genealogies ... [More]

Choice Devours Itself: So much for making your wishes known

Comment posted by Lydia on Mar 30, 10:30:

Clearly they went far beyond that, but it puts the family's claims in a different light if the state paid for it. No, I disagree. I don't think it puts anything in a different light, for the reasons that you and I have already agreed about, Mike. After all, as I pointed out, the state was trying _harder_ to be _more_ responsible for her, which is exactly the opposite of trying to back out of the responsibility of paying for anything. What people need to realize is that the idea of starving and dehydrating ... [More]

Choice Devours Itself: So much for making your wishes known

Comment posted by Mike T on Mar 30, 10:11:

He has a point insofar as it helps everyone understand who is responsible for what. If the state is paying, the family has no right to complain if the state stops paying and demands they take her back. (Clearly they went far beyond that, but it puts the family's claims in a different light if the state paid for it) If the family was fairly paying, that actually makes the case even worse since it puts the nursing home's behavior in the context of taking their money and then trying to kill the subject of the ... [More]

Part II of a Review of John H. Walton's The Lost World of Adam and Eve

Comment posted by Lydia on Mar 30, 09:42:

I understand, and being in a position where you "really" don't know does not place you in a position to say that you know the scientific view is wrong. Actually, Step2, that is not true unless I take some view such as that man first came into existence in, oh, 100 B.C., which of course you realize is not anything like what I am saying. You should, moreover, stop talking about "the scientific view" unqualified, as though _I_ am acknowledging that human evolution from ape-like ancestors _is_ the scientific ... [More]

Part III of a review of John H. Walton's The Lost World of Adam and Eve

Comment posted by Lydia on Mar 30, 09:35:

Of course all of those are very interesting questions and puzzles. For example, one idea is that the "making" of the sun on Day 4 means that it was caused to appear visible, while it was created and its light brought to the earth on Day 1. These sorts of puzzles, including the meaning of the word "yom," are questions that people discuss precisely _because_ they are concerned about the authority of Scripture, because they do _not_ simply say that it is a matter of fable. As I pointed out, even John H. Walton ... [More]

Choice Devours Itself: So much for making your wishes known

Comment posted by Lydia on Mar 30, 09:29:

Maybe because it is no more relevant than the answer to, "Who is doing the patient's hair these days?" Please, stop being deliberately dense. ... [More]

Zippy Catholic on Usury

Comment posted by Zippy on Mar 30, 08:07:

BI: All statements that Zippy makes about fiat currency and fractional reserves apply with double force to usury. That is flat out false. Fractional reserve banking is widely understood and information on it is widely available (has been for all of our entire lifetimes). Usury is not widely understood at all (thus my FAQ/ebook): you have to delve into centuries-old texts just to get an accurate grasp of what it does and does not mean. Fractional reserve banking (that is, holding less currency in a vaul ... [More]

Zippy Catholic on Usury

Comment posted by Bedarz Iliaci on Mar 30, 01:31:

Econ 101 nature of fractional reserve banking And how many people take Econ 101? All statements that Zippy makes about fiat currency and fractional reserves apply with double force to usury. Usury is not even regarded as sin by almost all denominations and it is doubtful that even the Catholic Church would bother. ... [More]

Part III of a review of John H. Walton's The Lost World of Adam and Eve

Comment posted by Bedarz Iliaci on Mar 30, 01:21:

Lydia, it all doesn't matter because the OT is just a bunch of Hebrew fables and Moses writing it had no authority, I take it that you are not unduly perturbed about the "days" and the "firmament" and how creation of vegetation on Day 3 precedes creation of the sun on Day 4 but you are very much concerned to establish uniqueness of Adam and Eve. Why do you privilege one statement of the Genesis over others? ... [More]

Choice Devours Itself: So much for making your wishes known

Comment posted by Bedarz Iliaci on Mar 30, 00:15:

I get the principles. I am only curious why we never get to know who is footing the bill in these situations. ... [More]

Part II of a Review of John H. Walton's The Lost World of Adam and Eve

Comment posted by Bedarz Iliaci on Mar 29, 23:52:

Lydia, I am inclined to agree with Step2 that there is no hint that the authors of Genesis had any gaps in mind while supplying their genealogies. ... [More]

Part III of a review of John H. Walton's The Lost World of Adam and Eve

Comment posted by Bedarz Iliaci on Mar 29, 23:48:

The terms "authority" and "authoritative" need to be completed by by the information "authority for whom" and "authoritative" over whom". OT had authority over the Jews and God-fearers but surely a Greek would not recognize OT as having any authority over him at all. So, even now OT is authoritative for non-Jews in a way Gita is not is only and entirely due to the authority of the Church. That "The OT was used by God to set the scene for Jesus" is we know and accept only and entirely due to the author ... [More]

Brazilian Magnates Inflict Dreadful Austerity on American Workers

Comment posted by Tony on Mar 29, 19:58:

Paul, it seems to me that the first likely result is short-term planning ousting long term planning / budgeting. Any project that will require 2 or 3 years of work before it pays off is going to have a hard time meeting the process demanded of it. That would seem to go also for new projects whose payoff is not yet determinable because the product (or method of production) has not yet been before so you can't know for sure it will sell, or if the new method will work. In short, this zero-based budgeting ... [More]

Zippy Catholic on Usury

Comment posted by Nice Marmot on Mar 29, 15:37:

"sounds like the treatment by Franks was sensible and thoughtful" Yes, I think so too. It's a 35 pp. essay and goes into considerable detail, so it's well worth reading in its entirety. ... [More]

Zippy Catholic on Usury

Comment posted by Tony on Mar 29, 14:50:

Tony -- are you suggesting that unless a bank holds capital at at 1:1 of the money it loans out, it has committed fraud? Depends on what you mean by "fractional reserve banking." Paul, I referred to bank notes in their origins. There, I stand by the question. I accept that later banking may be different in critical details. I take the origin of the bank note to be roughly what I outlined in this comment: Essentially, a paper document by a storer of gold saying "I have received X ounces of gold for st ... [More]

Zippy Catholic on Usury

Comment posted by Zippy on Mar 29, 12:11:

Paul: ... unless a bank holds capital at at 1:1 of the money it loans out ... The meaning of the question depends on the meaning of "holds capital". Non recourse notes against actual property are capital: in effect, they are preferred equity (that is, equity stakes with liquidation preference) in the actual property. Of course even a less than 1:1 ratio between various securities in a capital structure is not fraud, as long as the capital structure is fully disclosed to investors. Also, focus on ratios ... [More]

Zippy Catholic on Usury

Comment posted by Zippy on Mar 29, 12:00:

Lydia: I think I follow that about how an asset-backed loan could be regarded as usurious. I talk about that in my discussion of "recourse": "If the contract terms say that it is a violation of the contract for the lender to stop paying and turn the collateral over to the lender, then the loan is a mutuum and any interest charged is usury. The lender may be limited to recovering his principal and interest from the collateral legally, but the borrower is understood to have violated the terms. This is not ... [More]

Zippy Catholic on Usury

Comment posted by Paul J Cella on Mar 29, 01:35:

NM -- sounds like the treatment by Franks was sensible and thoughtful. I've long believed that the enthusiasm for ever more refined abstraction, combined with that arrogance of engineering which so often drives competitive math and business minds, lies at the root of the 2008 crisis. Unless wealth can remain firmly tethered, in the minds of economic actors, to the human creative power, natural goods, and social trust, from which all wealth arises, we end up in these dire situations where psychological facto ... [More]

Zippy Catholic on Usury

Comment posted by Tony on Mar 28, 18:13:

Can anyone explain why fractional reserve based bank notes (in its origins, at least) is anything other than fraud? ... [More]

Zippy Catholic on Usury

Comment posted by Andrew E. on Mar 28, 17:07:

Tony, Yes, when I say paper gold markets, I'm referring to the fractional reserve nature of bullion banking. Banks which trade in gold have far more gold oz denominated liabilities than they have actual gold oz on hand (100:1? 200:1? no one outside knows exactly except it's big). When I refer to paper gold collapsing I'm talking about a classic style bank run where the gold ounces cannot be printed up to meet liabilities. The Washington Agreement in 1997 established that the major central banks of the ... [More]

Part III of a review of John H. Walton's The Lost World of Adam and Eve

Comment posted by Tony on Mar 28, 15:55:

Moses had authority over Hebrews whom he led to freedom. It is not obvious how and why he came to have authority over 21st century world by himself. Independent of the Church, OT is merely a book of the Hebrew people, of no more relevance to Europeans than Gita. That's not the Catholic view of the OT, Bedarz. The OT was used by God to set the scene for Jesus, so that Jesus's life would fulfill the prophecies. Without authoritative prophecies, his fulfillment of them would not be the sign, the proof, tha ... [More]

Zippy Catholic on Usury

Comment posted by Lydia on Mar 28, 15:47:

I think I follow that about how an asset-backed loan could be regarded as usurious. Btw, the bit about going after the borrower is closely tied to the issue of the government's "enforcing judgements." The nature of a deficiency judgement is that "going after the person" part of it. I think those were, specifically, the type of judgement that Z. was saying should not be enforced, and that is why he implies that the absence of a deficiency judgement could rescue a loan from being usurious. If one's notion of ... [More]

Zippy Catholic on Usury

Comment posted by Tony on Mar 28, 15:33:

Tony, as far as your own approach to this, do you think that homeowner loans are not usurious even if the house is underwater and the borrower personally would be on the hook for the deficiency if he sold? Lydia, I was assuming that the house was _all_ the lender could go after with a home loan. If the lender can go after the house, and if that's not enough he can go after the borrower "personally" I don't think that's "asset-backed", that's recourse to the person. As far as I can tell, anyway: it doe ... [More]

Zippy Catholic on Usury

Comment posted by Nice Marmot on Mar 28, 13:51:

The Usury Prohibition and Natural Law: A Reappraisal, Christopher A. Franks, The Thomist 72 (2008) Franks suggests that "typically modern approaches to human agency, whether the extreme individualism of homo economicus or the voluntarism of a moral self whose primary feature is the freedom of indifference" cause misunderstandings of both Aquinas's teachings on usury and on natural law. Franks states: "A careful reading of Aquinas's usury teaching suggests that, for him, justice in economic exchange require ... [More]

Zippy Catholic on Usury

Comment posted by Lydia on Mar 28, 12:54:

So the government "declining to enforce judgments" would not have the least effect toward changing the position of home loans as not being usurious. I think the idea is that if there were no possibility of a deficiency judgement, the loan would be entirely asset based. Otherwise, if a deficiency judgement is possible and the house is underwater, the loan is partly asset-based and partly not. It can be partly recouped by going after the borrower personally. Tony, as far as your own approach to this, do you ... [More]

Zippy Catholic on Usury

Comment posted by Tony on Mar 28, 11:56:

because of the existence of the paper gold markets which masks/hides the true price of actual physical gold. Andrew, please clarify: are you referring to transactions "in gold" where what actually changes hands is not the physical gold but paper documents giving TITLE to an amount of gold? So that the gold bullion itself remains in its stored place? Although I find it rather humorous to think of paper documents stating titles to gold as being the instrument of choice for large transfers, (since that's ... [More]

Zippy Catholic on Usury

Comment posted by Tony on Mar 28, 11:50:

underwater-homeowners-sink-deeper-even-as-home-values-rise The irony gets thickest in these discussions when the usury apologia machine starts spinning the possibility of the government declining to enforce deficiency judgments ---- "Usury must be 'permitted', which is to say, usurious contracts incorporating deficiency judgments against persons must be enforced good and hard by the government, Of course, it is hard to locate any usury in homeowner loans, because these are almost all asset-backed loans. ... [More]

Part III of a review of John H. Walton's The Lost World of Adam and Eve

Comment posted by Lydia on Mar 28, 09:28:

Putting it rather dryly, it could hardly be said that Bedarz is articulating anything remotely like a high view of the authority of Scripture. Which Walton himself claims to hold, even going so far as inerrancy. Btw, "the church" in its earliest years regarded the Old Testament as having authority. One has only to read the epistles of St. Paul to see this quite clearly. Or the words of Jesus, without whom there would be no church. I doubt that Walton or those who are his target audience would at all care t ... [More]

Part III of a review of John H. Walton's The Lost World of Adam and Eve

Comment posted by Bedarz Iliaci on Mar 28, 02:01:

Moses had authority over Hebrews whom he led to freedom. It is not obvious how and why he came to have authority over 21st century world by himself. Independent of the Church, OT is merely a book of the Hebrew people, of no more relevance to Europeans than Gita. ... [More]

Choice Devours Itself: So much for making your wishes known

Comment posted by William Luse on Mar 28, 00:34:

It is strange that the payer gets no say in how his money is getting to be utilized. Bedarz was obviously deeply touched by the woman's plight. ... [More]

Part III of a review of John H. Walton's The Lost World of Adam and Eve

Comment posted by steve hays on Mar 27, 23:56:

So the OT had no authority until the day of Pentecost–or whenever you date the founding of the church of Rome and/or the papacy. That's your position? Moses had no authority? Jeremiah had no authority? Likewise, St. Paul had no authority? St. John had no authority? What about authority flowing from divine inspiration? What about divine authority flowing from a divine commission, viz. God sending Isaiah or Ezekiel to announce his message to Israel? Evidently, that doesn't figure in your religious ep ... [More]

Part III of a review of John H. Walton's The Lost World of Adam and Eve

Comment posted by Bedarz Iliaci on Mar 27, 23:40:

steve hays, Scripture possesses no authority by itself. All authority flows from the Church. It would be of personal interest to myself if you could point out any instance where Fr Jaki contradicts a Catholic dogma. Belloc is no authority but he is quotable for concision in expression. The full quote is OT is a collection of Hebrew fables that we believe on the authority of the Church. I think that most clearly expresses the Catholic (and as a non-sectarian person myself, the most rational) approach to OT ... [More]

Part III of a review of John H. Walton's The Lost World of Adam and Eve

Comment posted by steve hays on Mar 27, 12:12:

Bedarz: "You are being unfair to Fr Jaki. He wrote his book about Genesis 1.It is there in the title itself. He does not discuss Adam and Eve…" He also wrote Bible and Science. "And he believed in Transubstantiation because he accepted the Catholic dogma." So he believed in transubstantiation on the authority of the church (i.e. Church of Rome). Well then, what about believing Gen 1-3 on the authority of Scripture? "He interpreted Genesis 1 as a fable (so did Belloc who called OT a collection of Hebre ... [More]