What’s Wrong with the World

The men signed of the cross of Christ go gaily in the dark.

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What’s Wrong with the World is dedicated to the defense of what remains of Christendom, the civilization made by the men of the Cross of Christ. Athwart two hostile Powers we stand: the Jihad and Liberalism...read more

Recent Comments

"Doing Something" in Ferguson, MO

Comment posted by Lydia on Nov 25, 15:36:

My apologies, Jordan. I was wrongly guessing that you were insinuating that the term "Anglo" was racist. Sage, thanks again for the post. Our country is in grave trouble. I'm afraid race is a big part of it, and in this case there is also the refusal to stop the anarchy with strong means. I saw someone on Facebook just now accuse a mutual FB friend of being "vitriolic" for saying the rioting is unacceptable and should be stopped by force. Vitriolic. I wish now, I really wish, that we could go back to Au ... [More]

"Doing Something" in Ferguson, MO

Comment posted by Sage McLaughlin on Nov 25, 13:48:

Lydia, you're right about my usage, but Jordan is also right that it's at least unorthodox. It probably doesn't matter much, but Anglo-American didn't seem quite right since we're talking about the same tradition that is used throughout what is sometimes called the "Anglosphere." It's a tertiary point, but one I did hesitate over briefly before just saying "to heck with it" and moving on. Just getting something written through this head cold was enough for me. MikeT, there's no doubt that the emotional ... [More]

"Doing Something" in Ferguson, MO

Comment posted by Jordan S. on Nov 25, 13:48:

Yes, that's it. My concern was entirely with the use of the term "Anglo", which I despise. It's bizarre. What's wrong with "English" or "Anglo-American", if that's what's meant? Why "Anglo"? I have no beef with anything else in the post. I don't know if English common law was "specially developed to check that primitive impulse [to scapegoat]", but obviously that's not germane to the main point. With which I agree: that the "protesters" in this case have already tried and sentenced the accused and are not ... [More]

"Doing Something" in Ferguson, MO

Comment posted by Lydia on Nov 25, 12:36:

I don't know if that's true, but I'm more concerned about your language. When did "Anglo" become anything other than a prefix ("anglo-")? Oh, I see, Jordan, your "concern" here is purely grammatical? As someone who loves the beauty of the English language, you don't want to see a mere prefix turned into a free-standing adjective, is that it? Somehow, I'm guessing that's not it. The use of the term "Anglo" in the main post is quite clear: American law is based on the long tradition of English common law. ... [More]

"Doing Something" in Ferguson, MO

Comment posted by Mike T on Nov 25, 12:26:

It's hard for a lot of people to admit that those who reflexively sided with Brown here are, like Martin's supporters, often literally too stupid or emotionally invested to understand what they're demanding. At my old job, there was a black woman who, among many interesting legal theories about Zimmerman, said it didn't matter that there were no witnesses to the 4 minute window of time in which the fight took place. She said all the state had to do to show premeditation was Zimmerman getting out of the car ... [More]

"Doing Something" in Ferguson, MO

Comment posted by Jordan S. on Nov 25, 11:15:

"The Anglo custom of law was specially developed to check that primitive impulse." I don't know if that's true, but I'm more concerned about your language. When did "Anglo" become anything other than a prefix ("anglo-")? I see more and more people using it this way and I don't understand it. Is it short for "Anglo-Saxon" (meaning what exactly?) or "anglophone", or is it made up on analogy with "Latino"? ... [More]

"Doing Something" in Ferguson, MO

Comment posted by Lydia on Nov 25, 10:35:

Sage, this is excellent. I have been doing no more than scanning headlines on Ferguson and had not realized that some (other than the so-called protesters), that is, some who actually pretend to be grownups thinking soberly, are literally calling for a legally unwarranted trial as a sop to the protesters! This is a terrifying descent into legal anarchy, and for people who pretend to be serious to propose it is a sign of the unraveling of the west that I find it almost difficult to fathom. You explain why qu ... [More]

This is not a game

Comment posted by Lisa on Nov 24, 21:43:

Thanks for the great read all. Makes me slightly afraid for the future of our country, but all in all, it was an insightful and humorous read. And I will just be happy that my friend, who had an FTM sex change two years ago can now marry his boyfriend legally in my state, which makes me so happy because I think they are awesome and brave and the best people ever. And I hope they have babies if they want them. I'm sure they'd be excellent parents. :) ... [More]

He who pays the piper, Chapter #3,459,621

Comment posted by Lydia on Nov 24, 07:32:

Would you argue that you have a responsibility to force a patient to stop accessing porn on their cell phone while on your premises? And everything else that is legal but immoral? Not everything. Each thing has to be considered on its own merits. You can certainly block porn from any on-line network you have. But what you have to understand is that this isn't just about stopping your patient from doing things that are immoral. The point is that he is your _patient_. Therefore, what you have responsibility ... [More]

He who pays the piper, Chapter #3,459,621

Comment posted by Tony on Nov 24, 05:40:

I would say that if the sane person is choosing to live in your nursing home, you can tell him he has to leave and cannot carry out a hunger strike while he is your resident patient...[snip] If this person is so completely sane, so much in control of his own actions and decisions, then he can jolly well check himself out again and go with his creepy Hemlock friends and let them kill him somewhere else. Fine, then we are in 99% agreement. But _until_ they have removed themselves from the nursing home, you ... [More]

He who pays the piper, Chapter #3,459,621

Comment posted by Lydia on Nov 23, 23:39:

Steve Burton, you know nothing, at this moment, about any of us, about any of our other commitments, what else is going on in the rest of our lives, or what thoughts we do or do not have about Obama's recent diktat. You now apparently specialize in drive-by, thread-jacking snark. There is no reason why it should be tolerated, so further comments that are not on-topic for this post will be deleted. ... [More]

He who pays the piper, Chapter #3,459,621

Comment posted by Lydia on Nov 23, 23:36:

you cannot force-feed a sane person who goes on a hunger strike for the sake of the persecuted Christians in Iraq. An interesting point. I would say that if the sane person is choosing to live in your nursing home, you can tell him he has to leave and cannot carry out a hunger strike while he is your resident patient. And I would say that you should say just precisely that. Same for active suicide. Living in a nursing home isn't even like renting an apartment in an apartment building. (And I would argue ... [More]

He who pays the piper, Chapter #3,459,621

Comment posted by Tony on Nov 23, 23:08:

Point a here is true as a general rule but the very same logic could be applied to suicide. There are things that we can choose to _define_ as meaning that a patient isn't in his right mind. You know, it's a funny thing, but they are not equally ripe for the conclusion "he must not be in his right mind. Not quite. We are usually quite ready to suppose that if someone killed himself, he may have been insane. But we also realize that there are a few people who have truly forsaken rightness, have embraced ... [More]

He who pays the piper, Chapter #3,459,621

Comment posted by steve burton on Nov 23, 21:45:

Amazing. The greatest usurpation of power in the whole history of America has just taken place, with the gravest possible implications for the future, & nobody who's left here can even be bothered to take notice. Once upon a time, this blog was seriously concerned about immigration issues. Not any more, it seems. ... [More]

Of public school teachers and purple penguins--the zero-sum game continues

Comment posted by Latias on Nov 23, 19:21:

I watched the Teletubbies (particularly Tinky Winky), although I wasn't an infant, and I turned out just fine. ... [More]

Surrogacy, selfishness, and IVF

Comment posted by Shone M on Nov 23, 17:30:

I chose to do IVF instead of adopting, and I am very happy that I did so. I have no guilt at all about how my own child came into the world. I am happy that I planned to have my child, and that she is a wanted child. Losers who go out, get drunk, have sex and oops! become pregnant, and then want help from everyone else to pay for the child - or worse, tried to demand that someone adopt the child and pay for his upbringing. These are the people who have no respect for human life, because they became pregnan ... [More]

What evidentialism is not

Comment posted by Michael Shuman on Nov 23, 08:55:

Hello. I really enjoyed your article, especially the last part about the fallacy of objections. I think the notion of reformed epistemology can be a great bridge between a fideism on the one hand and a rationalism on the other. Have you considered that? Additionally, I would like to comment that I think that in no way is an evidentialist approach married to an Arminian soteriology. Calvinists and moderate Calvinists should absolutely still be committed to loving the Lord their God with all their minds ... [More]

What evidentialism is not

Comment posted by Lydia on Nov 22, 12:35:

By all means, link it all over! Thanks very much for your comments, Rebekah. You are exactly the sort of person to whom I hoped this would be helpful. ... [More]

What evidentialism is not

Comment posted by Rebekah on Nov 22, 11:55:

Thank you for writing this excellent post. It is very timely for me as I have recently entered into the realm of apologetics after struggling through an extended season of doubt myself. The concept of the fallacy of objections is particularly helpful. I think wolves employ this tactic to either (1) undermine the belief of those of us that are newcomers to apologetics and/or (2) undermine our credibility in the eyes of others that themselves do not have a category for the fallacy of objections. I have be ... [More]

He who pays the piper, Chapter #3,459,621

Comment posted by Scott W. on Nov 22, 08:30:

The hospital argued that it should not be considered a violation of the nurse's conscience "merely" to require her to do intake and prep. work for the abortion and clean up after the abortion (disposing of the baby's body, etc.) as long as the nurses were not literally constrained to be present while the abortion was taking place and to assist _directly_ with that procedure. The nurses, rightly in my view, objected to this. Their objection involved the idea that, by taking on the abortion-minded women as t ... [More]

He who pays the piper, Chapter #3,459,621

Comment posted by Lydia on Nov 21, 16:48:

Because (a) he cannot be in his right mind if he is trying maim himself, and (b) state law doesn't preclude you from treating such behavior as a form of insanity or otherwise lack of intent. Point a here is true as a general rule but the very same logic could be applied to suicide. There are things that we can choose to _define_ as meaning that a patient isn't in his right mind. Suicide would seem to be #1 on the list! If, on the other hand, we state that suicide can't be defined that way and that someone ... [More]

He who pays the piper, Chapter #3,459,621

Comment posted by Lydia on Nov 21, 16:37:

If you are a nurse, you can (morally) work IN a hospital that does abortions and even work around other nurses and doctors who perform abortions, without actually helping those abortionists. The fact that the hospital does abortions doesn't give you the moral responsibility to stop those heinous acts that occur on their premises with your knowledge. Well, yes and no. This issue and the limits of this principle have come up recently when hospitals have attempted to coerce nurses into taking on pregnant wom ... [More]

He who pays the piper, Chapter #3,459,621

Comment posted by Tony on Nov 21, 15:56:

Well, no, if they are killing the patient under your facility's roof, then I can't agree with this characterization. Note that as long as the person is vacillating, the person is obviously still your patient. I thought I took the case where the patient himself is insisting on suicide (or administered death). No vacillating anymore. I agree that it occurs "under your roof", and this normally implies a degree of responsibility to stop this grievous evil act. But additional factors are in play in additio ... [More]

He who pays the piper, Chapter #3,459,621

Comment posted by Lydia on Nov 21, 15:21:

Also, if the intent of these laws were literally to take the patient out of the care of the nursing home with a conscientious objection, then the laws would allow objecting homes to refuse and require that the patient discharge himself and transfer to another facility. They don't allow that because that isn't the intent. They aren't taking the patient out of the care of the objecting facility. They are requiring the facility to subsidize the murder by allowing it to take place *on their premises*, in the sp ... [More]

He who pays the piper, Chapter #3,459,621

Comment posted by Lydia on Nov 21, 15:16:

I think myself that we need to start thinking outside the box altogether. For example: A Christian network of registered nurses, physicians assistants, doctors, and also non-medical caregivers, all committed to house calls, joining together to form a home health care coalition. Through donations, the organization could means-test prospective clients and offer greatly reduced rates or free in-home care for those who cannot afford to pay. There would still be a doctor-patient relationship, but no institutiona ... [More]

He who pays the piper, Chapter #3,459,621

Comment posted by Lydia on Nov 21, 14:08:

In the proposed CA bill, by the way, the facilities were required to continue to keep on staff actual employees of their own who killed patients. So you'd in that case be paying the salary of a doctor, nurse, or other employee who was murdering people as part of their job, on-site in your facility. ... [More]

He who pays the piper, Chapter #3,459,621

Comment posted by Lydia on Nov 21, 13:29:

then at that point both legally and morally that patient is no longer under your care. The state has, at that point, REMOVED from your care that patient, against your intention and against your best efforts. Well, no, if they are killing the patient under your facility's roof, then I can't agree with this characterization. Note that as long as the person is vacillating, the person is obviously still your patient. The patient is only taken out of your care if literally taken out of your care--i.e., removed ... [More]

He who pays the piper, Chapter #3,459,621

Comment posted by DeGaulle on Nov 21, 12:18:

Thank you both for your replies. You have certainly got to the gist of the matter. I would suspect any nursing home owners who stand by their patients or make any efforts to prolong their lives against the wishes of the State will very quickly lose their licences. It is apparent in other issues how quickly and zealously the culture of Moloch takes situations to their conclusion. I fear that, like children with Down's Syndrome and other "distasteful" conditions, people with dementia will become rare as hens' ... [More]

He who pays the piper, Chapter #3,459,621

Comment posted by Tony on Nov 21, 12:07:

And you can make a nursing home explicit policy "we completely disregard patient instructions toward causing death if they become incompacitated, including so-called medical directives which direct us to take non-medical immoral acts. As a consequence, by accepting our care you hereby alter your prior directives toward killing you. And any medical directive signed after you enter is subject to our consent to the conditions. Sign here..." Sure, you will get grief from the state. But the state's options ... [More]

He who pays the piper, Chapter #3,459,621

Comment posted by Tony on Nov 21, 11:05:

Essentially, it's standing by while your patient, under your care, in your nursing home, slits his wrists or hangs himself or blows his head off with a gun. Lydia, I accept everything you say in problem 1, as a general characterization of what now holds. But what I am suggesting is that if and when we get to state-mandated "nursing homes must allow for patient-directed suicide" is that at the point where a patient (in spite of your consistent work caring for them and alleviating their causes for wanting t ... [More]

He who pays the piper, Chapter #3,459,621

Comment posted by Lydia on Nov 21, 10:25:

I would suggest, very tentatively, that you could say to an elderly bent on suicide "what you do in your assigned room is your business, but I do not provide any services toward death." And then just not actively step in the way of anybody coming in to administer drugs or whatever. And say to the state officials that claim that you have to provide assistance to those who want help killing themselves, "my conscience forbids that I assist them, but I won't obstruct others carrying out their evil acts." And th ... [More]

What evidentialism is not

Comment posted by Lydia on Nov 21, 08:23:

Yes, it's amazing how much evidence is there in the first chapters of Acts. The death of Stephen, for example. The Romans _tried_ to avoid that kind of thing. They frowned on it, and later (around 62, I believe) there was actually a bit of trouble with the Romans when James the Just was killed by a mob in a manner very reminiscent of the killing of Stephen. But in this case, Stephen just got stoned to death, and there were no repercussions. After that Saul of Tarsus set forth on a rampaging persecution of C ... [More]

What evidentialism is not

Comment posted by Tony on Nov 21, 08:07:

Someone was asking me on Facebook whether the layman would need to know additional church history to know that some apostles died for their testimony. I pointed out that the book of Acts, in sober and credible historical terms, shows them as _willing_ to die for their testimony again and again. Lydia, that's a good point. A potential Christian hearing evidence now for Christianity just isn't in the same position as the Jews on Pentecost. He isn't coming off the recent Passover, and the recent public even ... [More]

He who pays the piper, Chapter #3,459,621

Comment posted by Tony on Nov 21, 07:50:

DeGaulle, in my opinion the state killing the aged is not much different from the Roman state killing the Christians, and a good Christian can submit to it in much the same way. That is, you can choose go quietly as a martyr, you can go testifying to the fact that murder is a grave evil in God's eyes, you can go loudly singing praises to God, and you can go physically fighting against evil knowing it won't do you any good. All of these are morally legitimate. As for the people running a nursing home, t ... [More]

He who pays the piper, Chapter #3,459,621

Comment posted by Lydia on Nov 20, 19:11:

Well, obviously, one can't ethically set aside a death room in one's nursing home for the use of Exit. So there's one bright line right there. I think increasingly people are going to prefer dying at home. This is relevant even to things like receiving nutrition and hydration. At least you can (in theory) be spoon fed at home. See my post here: http://www.whatswrongwiththeworld.net/2012/12/a_case_for_throwing_patients_o.html ... [More]

He who pays the piper, Chapter #3,459,621

Comment posted by DeGaulle on Nov 20, 14:28:

Lydia, it may well have the deepest consequences for all who do not have the resources to afford their old age care, which, given the already astronomical costs and the dismal prospects for world economics, will be the vast majority. How do we protect ourselves? How do we defend our loved ones? We will need new religious doctrine to deal with these new situations. Is it a mortal sin to give in meekly to state pressure or must we resist? How do we resist? Because as surely as night follows day, once one cost ... [More]

He who pays the piper, Chapter #3,459,621

Comment posted by Lydia on Nov 20, 12:28:

Thanks, DeGaulle. I think that all over the world the government has gotten involved in paying for healthcare for the elderly. I'm not such a diehard libertarian as to say that this is intrinsically bad policy. But it does open up all sorts of problems when the "chattering classes" go to the bad and control government policies. This has implications for Christian institutions from a purely prudential point of view. ... [More]

What evidentialism is not

Comment posted by Lydia on Nov 20, 09:16:

Joshua, thanks. The topic sounds interesting, but thus far here at W4 guest posts have always been from friends or family members of contributors whose writing is already known to a contributor. Please feel free to write the post on what presuppositionalism is not and link it in this thread! I'm sure people will read it with interest. I do know of many presuppositionalists who discuss evidence for Christianity. Mark Thomas, thank you so much! ... [More]

What evidentialism is not

Comment posted by Mark Thomas on Nov 20, 01:44:

Lydia, I just wanted to say that your article is exactly what I was hoping you would write at some point. Not to say in any way that I would have anticipated you to cover such points, but that the points that you did cover are very beneficial for the public at large to be aware of. Thank you, and keep writing. -Mark ... [More]

What evidentialism is not

Comment posted by Joshua WD Smith on Nov 19, 20:30:

Good post. Would you be willing to let a guest post on "What presuppositionalism is not?" I keep seeing that position mis-characterized as "not bothering with evidence," or some such like. ... [More]