What’s Wrong with the World

The men signed of the cross of Christ go gaily in the dark.

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What’s Wrong with the World is dedicated to the defense of what remains of Christendom, the civilization made by the men of the Cross of Christ. Athwart two hostile Powers we stand: the Jihad and Liberalism...read more

Recent Comments

California never quits

Comment posted by R.C. on Aug 27, 09:36:

Does the law forbid even doing basic counseling on chastity? It seems that any sort of chastity counseling would focus on ways to reduce sexual desires. It seems that this counseling would be okay for teens who are experiencing heterosexual attraction, but not homosexual attraction, because such counseling would have as its express purpose reducing same-sex oriented desires. That sounds incoherent: "Pastor Dave, I've got a crush on someone at school and I've had a hard time controlling my thoughts in th ... [More]

California never quits

Comment posted by Lydia on Aug 27, 09:06:

Good point about a lawsuit. I believe the phrase is "unprofessional conduct." Could they then be sued for "unprofessional conduct"? Presumably so. ... [More]

California never quits

Comment posted by DR84 on Aug 27, 01:22:

-These type of laws strike me as barely concealed recruitment efforts. It is my understanding that a kid who even questions if they are experiencing same sex attractions or gender confusion can only receive counseling to embrace those feelings and desires that they might have. I am not sure what else to call that but recruitment. Even in the case of children who definitely are experiencing same sex attractions or gender confusion this counseling is still recruitment in the sense that they can only be told ... [More]

California never quits

Comment posted by DR84 on Aug 27, 01:22:

-These type of laws strike me as barely concealed recruitment efforts. It is my understanding that a kid who even questions if they are experiencing same sex attractions or gender confusion can only receive counseling to embrace those feelings and desires that they might have. I am not sure what else to call that but recruitment. Even in the case of children who definitely are experiencing same sex attractions or gender confusion this counseling is still recruitment in the sense that they can only be told ... [More]

California never quits

Comment posted by CJ on Aug 26, 18:31:

But mutilation and massive doses of hormones are healthcare! ... [More]

A strange variety of "apolitical evangelicalism"

Comment posted by Jan on Aug 26, 12:29:

Piper apparently has forgotten that most of the political work of our founding fathers was either directly instigated by ministers of the church or heavily influenced by them. Indeed, according to the excellent historical research by Wallbuilders, this country would likely never been established without the direct political involvement of the church. ... [More]

The Gulag

Comment posted by Mark on Aug 25, 20:49:

I wasn't saying anything needed to be ideally unified. That's not what I meant by "idealizing". Comparisons are at the core of human nature. But we've already gotten sidetracked from the thread so it's a good place to end for now. We can pick it up another time. ... [More]

The Gulag

Comment posted by Nice Marmot on Aug 25, 09:32:

Mark, I think you're missing the point. The 'reference' culture doesn't have to be ideally unified for it to serve as an example. Numerous conservatives have pointed this out over the years w/r/t the Medieval era, the Old South, the 1950's, whatever. Have you not read them? Previous societies do not have to be seen as golden in order to document the widespread rust present in ours. ... [More]

This is what a problem with religious freedom looks like

Comment posted by Mark on Aug 25, 00:05:

>> So there's definitely an acceleration of this anti-Christian stuff, and it really does look like it is a change since you served. That doesn't mean you are "naive" or anything else insulting. It just means there's new data now. New data that I’m not aware of? Um, no. And yes, I’ve seen the videos. Just to be clear, I didn't serve and didn't claim to. I’m loathe to cite personal experience, and I don’t know why I ignored that and gave my past experience on an airbase, since I know Christian young men pe ... [More]

The Gulag

Comment posted by Mark on Aug 24, 20:39:

Nice, why do you keep avoiding the fact that the only examples of this unity you wish are imaginary? What society in what time meets your criteria? You're clearly idealizing a past society. Is it medieval society? You wouldn't be the first. Or is there a current society that is doing the things S and Chambers describe? As I've said from the beginning, you can't judge without a comparison in a fallen world. What is your point of comparison? ... [More]

Having Principles Means Having Fewer Choices

Comment posted by The Masked Chicken on Aug 24, 13:43:

Dear Reader John, Article 35 is a poorly stated version of the doctrine of Double Effect, since it does not discuss the conditions under which it comes into play: 1. The nature of the act is itself good, or at least morally neutral; 2. The agent intends the good effect and not the bad either as a means to the good or as an end itself; 3. The good effect outweighs the bad effect in circumstances sufficiently grave to justify causing the bad effect and the agent exercises due diligence to minimize the ha ... [More]

This is what a problem with religious freedom looks like

Comment posted by Lydia on Aug 24, 12:54:

If you read many of Weinstein's rants, you will see that he's always accusing Christians in the military of being Islamophobic. So I would guess that his obsession with goading the military to punish "religious" displays doesn't extend to Islam. ... [More]

This is what a problem with religious freedom looks like

Comment posted by johnt on Aug 24, 12:33:

Has there been any similar action taken against an islamist? As of now I doubt it. ... [More]

But wait, there's more! Refuting a claim of discrepancy in the gospels

Comment posted by Lydia on Aug 24, 10:09:

I published and replied at my personal blog this morning. ... [More]

This is what a problem with religious freedom looks like

Comment posted by Lydia on Aug 24, 08:16:

I remember many of those conversations. Mark, when I was talking about the changes in the military in a historical way, I didn't mean to imply that specifically these religious freedom issues have been with us for that long. I was doing more of a "root causes" or "long process of change" kind of thing. I would definitely say that the religious freedom issues have become much more acute after 9/11. (By which I'm not designating 9/11 as the cause of the change but merely saying "after that," since you broug ... [More]

The Gulag

Comment posted by Nice Marmot on Aug 24, 07:41:

"But you seem non-plussed that the idea of decline was always present in the West. Since the beginning. I think you're not grasping the significance of this. Decline is always possible, and a worry, because it can happen." Yes, of course. But what's important right now is the nature and severity of the current manifestation of decline. Long-term depreciation of your vehicle ceases to be an issue if you're headed for a cliff at 70 mph. ... [More]

But wait, there's more! Refuting a claim of discrepancy in the gospels

Comment posted by edwardtbabinski on Aug 24, 01:01:

Hi Lydia, Has my comment and your reply been deleted? I rec'd email notification that you had responded to it. But I don't see it tonight as I look at the comments on your post. ... [More]

The Gulag

Comment posted by Mark on Aug 24, 00:52:

But you seem non-plussed that the idea of decline was always present in the West. Since the beginning. I think you're not grasping the significance of this. Decline is always possible, and a worry, because it can happen. I don't think it's question of progress or decline in a linear fashion. Not sure you can have one without the other. I suspect many things are cyclical. A dynamic nation, or life, is a "blooming, buzzing confusion". It's good that it is; people long for statism, but they don't know what th ... [More]

But wait, there's more! Refuting a claim of discrepancy in the gospels

Comment posted by edwardtbabinski on Aug 24, 00:42:

Hi Lydia, You may have heard of NT scholar, Mark Goodacre, who is well known for his expertise concerning The Synoptic Problem and who recently contributed to a new book from Baker Academic, The Synoptic Problem: Four Views, along with Craig Evans (an Evangelical), and others http://bakerpublishinggroup.com/books/the-synoptic-problem/348491 Two other Evangelicals, Blomberg and Stein, gave the book positive blurbs as well. Goodacre has also appeared on the Evangelical podcast, Deeper Waters: https://youtu.b ... [More]

This is what a problem with religious freedom looks like

Comment posted by Mark on Aug 24, 00:27:

Some things never change. I was clued into the subject of pacifist distortion of the idea of Christians in the Roman military by a book on JWT. Christians who wished to “serve with their bodies” volunteered in significant numbers for service in the Roman army, and remained so even during periods of state persecution. It was an all-volunteer force. It’s a persistent but discredited myth that Christians before the era of Constantine were pacifists who didn’t enlist in the Roman military (army and navy). http ... [More]

This is what a problem with religious freedom looks like

Comment posted by Mark on Aug 24, 00:14:

But sensitivity training is common throughout society. I've had I don't know how many hours of sexual harassment training over the years in corporations. They are highly political. And now, even in Christian colleges it's now ramped up to include racial and gender identity sensitivities familiar to the rest of the world to an amazingly high degree. I'll derisively call it indoctrination for sure, since it is neutral in no way. I'm skeptical that we can say it's qualitatively different for the military becau ... [More]

This is what a problem with religious freedom looks like

Comment posted by DR84 on Aug 23, 22:30:

I'm sure Gushee is gleefully forward to traditional religious institutions losing tax exempt status and perhaps facing crippling fines on top of that for "discrimination". He probably feels he is being overly kind trying to convince us "bigots" and "heretics" to "voluntarily" change our views. Have we gotten to the point where it may be a good idea for leaders or institutions who still hold to the correct (aka traditional) view of sexual morality and ethics to get together and issue a defiant warning back ... [More]

This is what a problem with religious freedom looks like

Comment posted by Lydia on Aug 23, 16:52:

If that's your idea of fun, a Mark Yarhouse response would be even more fun. I expect Moore to discover his backbone on this particular issue. ... [More]

This is what a problem with religious freedom looks like

Comment posted by Nice Marmot on Aug 23, 16:08:

I'm greatly looking forward to a Russell Moore response to it. That will be fun. ... [More]

This is what a problem with religious freedom looks like

Comment posted by Lydia on Aug 23, 15:38:

I wonder if Gushee thinks we should thank him for the warning/threat. ... [More]

This is what a problem with religious freedom looks like

Comment posted by Nice Marmot on Aug 23, 14:59:

Re: religious freedom and the zero sum game, from an apostate Baptist: http://religionnews.com/2016/08/22/on-lgbt-equality-middle-ground-is-disappearing/ ... [More]

This is what a problem with religious freedom looks like

Comment posted by Lydia on Aug 23, 08:35:

and a microcosm of American society. I'd say the military has been more avant garde than the rest of society for, as you say, Mark, many decades. I agree that there's a chicken and egg issue. It's like the age-old question, does art influence society or does society influence art? But in this case I'd say the social engineers were pushing the envelope in the military in ways that society at large was unhappy with and had a general sense of themselves as doing so. It was an opportunity. DACOWITS wasn't _re ... [More]

The Gulag

Comment posted by Nice Marmot on Aug 23, 07:57:

~~I think the use of the word "certain" here seems to understate. It is a massive debt, which was absorbed by Christendom. Christianity absorbed it so deeply they can't be separated from each other when one says the "West".~~ Agreed. I meant by "certain" exactly what the word signifies: some, but not all. ~~Sever the "roots" of anything and it dies.~~~ No doubt. But it doesn't die instantly. This is where Chambers' judgment comes in to play. That the roots are being cut isn't a question to him. The ques ... [More]

This is what a problem with religious freedom looks like

Comment posted by Mark on Aug 23, 00:10:

>> I really think a big part of the problem is that the U.S. military is this ginormous jobs bonanza. We've seen it with feminism and women in the military. The military is so _big_ and has so much _money_ and so many careers invested in it that it was inevitable that the social engineers would want to take it over and use it for their own ends. In the most general terms, the military is two things. A very large organization, and a microcosm of American society. It was always the latter, and at least as si ... [More]

This is what a problem with religious freedom looks like

Comment posted by Lydia on Aug 22, 23:50:

You talk about Weinstein having friends in positions of power, but how did he get them? The leftists took over the military. It's a long story. I doubt that you know more of it than I do. I'm not going to let you hijack this thread as you have many others. I could try to answer you reasonably. I could tell you that I have no objections to a "victim narrative" about Christians (since in many cases it's true, and as long as the instances given are truthfully related). I could give you examples of organizat ... [More]

The Gulag

Comment posted by Mark on Aug 22, 23:17:

>> Western civilization's roots are in what was formerly called Christendom, which of course absorbed certain Greco-Roman ideas. I think the use of the word "certain" here seems to understate. It is a massive debt, which was absorbed by Christendom. Christianity absorbed it so deeply they can't be separated from each other when one says the "West". >> Chambers' intuition was correct -- sever those roots, and the West isn't really the West anymore. But this is a tautology. Sever the "roots" of anything an ... [More]

This is what a problem with religious freedom looks like

Comment posted by Crude on Aug 22, 22:58:

A "Christian, right-wing version of Weinstein" wouldn't need to take any particular tone. He would just need to be, through the luck of the political draw, listened to by the guys who decide what to investigate and what agenda to push. That is precisely what's happened with Weinstein. It's not like his sheer craziness has paid off. I can name someone else for whom what you call 'sheer craziness' is paying dividends. But let's put that aside. Weinstein comes off as a nutjob. Then again, so does Dan Savage. ... [More]

This is what a problem with religious freedom looks like

Comment posted by Lydia on Aug 22, 22:25:

Weinstein's approach only "works" because he happens to have sympathetic hearers in positions of power. It has nothing to do with his position being such that "people can relate to" it. I would guess that most ordinary Americans who read his rants would just be put off by them. A "Christian, right-wing version of Weinstein" wouldn't need to take any particular tone. He would just need to be, through the luck of the political draw, listened to by the guys who decide what to investigate and what agenda to pus ... [More]

This is what a problem with religious freedom looks like

Comment posted by Crude on Aug 22, 21:56:

The problem is that, unless someone can think of a better way*, we need some right-wing, Christian versions of Weinstein. People who manage to state their grievance in terms of victimhood that - crucially - other people may be able to relate to, even if crazy. Of course, we can always decide "No, we'll be the mature party. We'll be calm, gracious, and we'll always be open to dialogue with men like Weinstein, and score a moral victory even if we lose." Popular option nowadays, I hear. ... [More]

This is what a problem with religious freedom looks like

Comment posted by Lydia on Aug 21, 20:59:

DR84, if you see the video from (I think) 2013 that I linked in the main post, you'll see that it seems to be have taken root quite seriously. I'm thinking perhaps the Air Force is the worst offender of the branches. I don't know which is the least affected by hostility to Christianity, though I might very tentatively guess the Marines. (That is ignorance speaking, though.) I really think a big part of the problem is that the U.S. military is this ginormous jobs bonanza. We've seen it with feminism and wom ... [More]

This is what a problem with religious freedom looks like

Comment posted by DR84 on Aug 21, 17:31:

I am sure the rainbow flag would be permitted, if nothing else, consider the media outrage if an officer were punished for displaying it. They would be calling for heads. Displaying a Bible and getting punished or facing punishment is a non-story, who cares? In my experience, committed activists who oppose Christianity and other traditional religions do not believe they have a religion. They just believe the facts and what science says. They have no faith, no beliefs, no ideology. It's crazy stuff, but ... [More]

The Gulag

Comment posted by Nice Marmot on Aug 21, 15:15:

Anti-communism provided little deep cultural unity beyond a response to the perceived immediate threat. That was barely enough to hold the Right together, let alone the culture of the entire country. "Christianity is also in there, but it came a bit later and Christianity is hard to pin down culturally because of its universal nature." Western civilization's roots are in what was formerly called Christendom, which of course absorbed certain Greco-Roman ideas. The West is not only in denial about the exis ... [More]

This is what a problem with religious freedom looks like

Comment posted by DeGaulle on Aug 21, 13:25:

Please don't take my comment too much to heart. I was only venting. It is difficult not to be frustrated when observing that even the military of the United States is falling victim to the cancer of cultural Marxism that seems to have metastisised throughout every institution in the West. DR84, the free speech of your country is something you rightly celebrate, but it is becoming severely constricted. It is desperately distressing and highly symbolic if a soldier, whose very way of life means exposing hims ... [More]

This is what a problem with religious freedom looks like

Comment posted by Lydia on Aug 21, 12:51:

We are emphatically not going to be discussing "rooting for Putin" on this thread. Or rooting for him. That is about as OT as it gets. DR84, I'm sure the rainbow flag would be joyously permitted. In fact, I pointed out in my earlier posts three years ago on this whole phenomenon that the military has for a very long time been carrying out sensitivity training, which is *obviously* threatening lower-ranking soldiers' careers if they do not subscribe to a particular ideology or at least keep their mouths sh ... [More]

This is what a problem with religious freedom looks like

Comment posted by DR84 on Aug 21, 11:17:

DeGaulle- One difference between us and the Soviets is that we are still free to speak openly about the bad things happening in our country. Be careful what you wish for. The cultural rot has infected Europe too and the Russians and Chinese systems leave a lot to be desired. ... [More]