What’s Wrong with the World

The men signed of the cross of Christ go gaily in the dark.

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What’s Wrong with the World is dedicated to the defense of what remains of Christendom, the civilization made by the men of the Cross of Christ. Athwart two hostile Powers we stand: the Jihad and Liberalism...read more

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Christians in Netherlands face possible prosecution for opposing homosexual acts

Comment posted by Lydia on Jan 14, 14:23:

I don't know what the precise connection is, but my understanding is that some Euro countries have laws against (in essence) saying things that hurt people's feelings, according to specially protected class status. Hate speech, etc. Presumably signing a public statement could hurt someone's feelings in a way that saying it under your breath in the basement wouldn't. So they may call that "discrimination" under the Dutch Constitution. ... [More]

Christians in Netherlands face possible prosecution for opposing homosexual acts

Comment posted by Tony on Jan 13, 19:56:

set the precedent that saying "transwomen" are men Suppose (taking a hypothetical here) that I am a person who is very sympathetic to the trans movement, and I refer to a "transwoman" and say "he is a man", meaning by that phrase that "here is a person who used to be thought of as a woman, but she "trans-ed" away from that to become a man..." Because there is no ACTUAL LOGIC to the grammar involved, there is no INTRINSIC reason "transwoman" must use the "woman" element to refer to the terminus ad quem ra ... [More]

Christians in Netherlands face possible prosecution for opposing homosexual acts

Comment posted by Lydia on Jan 13, 17:18:

It is 2019. But just barely, and I take your point. ... [More]

Christians in Netherlands face possible prosecution for opposing homosexual acts

Comment posted by DR84 on Jan 13, 09:57:

It's not even 2019 and already a western country is considering prosecuting Christians for simply speaking basic Christian beliefs. Go figure. What would have to happen for such a thing to happen here in the US? I'm thinking, at least in the near future, it would begin with court packing or some means of by the left to ensure unfavorable court rulings can be safely ignored. I have mentioned before there is already a case in Canada being pursued by an activist with the intent to set the precedent that s ... [More]

Christians in Netherlands face possible prosecution for opposing homosexual acts

Comment posted by Lydia on Jan 12, 23:51:

Yeah, it's ridiculous. "Err, I discriminated against this guy in hiring for a job as an editor because he was illiterate. Guess I committed a crime." It's a meaningless law because it is too broad to make any sense. Maybe that's the point. They can fill it with whatever meaning they want, even blatantly hunting down people on the basis of their religious beliefs, which are enumerated in the article. ... [More]

Christians in Netherlands face possible prosecution for opposing homosexual acts

Comment posted by Becky on Jan 12, 23:21:

"Discrimination... on any other grounds whatsoever shall not be permitted.” I'm speechless. How does one explain to people, in the Netherlands or Canada or the US, that this criteria for determining what is and is not unjust discrimination, empties the idea of criteria of meaning? How can you be law-abiding if you don't know what the laws are? More simply put, justice is the advantage of the stronger, and will not be defined or expressed in advance of the strong judge's decision? ... [More]

Zippy Catholic: Requiescat in pace

Comment posted by Chris Collins on Jan 12, 11:42:

I think his Usury FAQ is great. And it was always a delight to read his blog. He got to the point and dealt with objections in a clear, unassailable way. My thanks to whoever is maintaining his site. ... [More]

Christians in Netherlands face possible prosecution for opposing homosexual acts

Comment posted by Lydia on Jan 12, 09:21:

Thanks for the info, Willem. That's a very disturbing symbol, particularly if jail time is a possibility. A shot across the bow, as we say in English. ... [More]

More on ur-source theories vs. undesigned coincidences

Comment posted by Lydia on Jan 12, 08:57:

To me the cutting down of the tree sounds much more violent and negative than bringing the Gentiles into the fold and the negative Jewish reaction. That series of events is I think definitely symbolized by the welcoming of the Prodigal Son and the subsequent dialogue between the father and the older son--the older son being the Jews. ... [More]

Christians in Netherlands face possible prosecution for opposing homosexual acts

Comment posted by Willem Jan Blom on Jan 12, 03:34:

I live in the Netherlands, and I have followed this issue the past few days. Currently, the Public Prosecution Service is investigating whether the signing of the Nashville Statement is punishable or not. I can't find out what penalty can be given. In the past, individuals were sentenced to serve a few months in jail. However, I don't think that will be the case for the three hundred people who signed the Nashville Statement. A few years ago, a Dutch politician was convicted of discrimination, but he didn' ... [More]

More on ur-source theories vs. undesigned coincidences

Comment posted by Thomas Hamilton on Jan 12, 01:46:

Thanks, I hadn’t considered that. I’ll be thinking it over, but here are some tentative thoughts- the parable seems to echo the language of John the Baptist in Luke 3: “produce fruit worthy of repentance” and “even now the axe is laid to the root of the tree.” “Every tree that does not bear fruit is cut down...” The context is of course the promise of the one who will come and baptize with fire. Within a year of the close of Jesus’ ministry, that promise is fulfilled in the outpouring of the Holy Spirit. Wh ... [More]

Hoaxer or historical witness: The Johannine Dilemma

Comment posted by Thomas Hamilton on Jan 11, 22:48:

Lydia, Thanks for your response! I’ll let this be my last comment as I have no desire to hijack your blog for a topic of only marginal relevance. Having now written it, I have to honestly apologize for the length. Whenever I start writing something I intend to be a few paragraphs, if tends to turn out much larger than expected. I won’t cry myself to sleep if it’s moderated for that reason. 1) I generally avoid using the word “numerology” to describe my own views on the use of numbers in scripture because ... [More]

Christians in Netherlands face possible prosecution for opposing homosexual acts

Comment posted by Sean Killackey on Jan 11, 22:30:

I found nothing insulting about the Nashville Statement, and was pleased that it didn't needlessly cloud the issue with, as you say, "breast-beating about how badly (how?) Christians have treated "LGBTQ persons," or that sort of nonsense". I only wish that they had included more on why what Scripture says is true. However, what it says seems pretty sound, so I signed it. In line with what you were commenting about, have you seen this: https://www.theamericanconservative.com/dreher/the-john-finnis-line-in-t ... [More]

More on ur-source theories vs. undesigned coincidences

Comment posted by Lydia on Jan 11, 18:23:

I'll have to mull that one. One difficulty is that there is no clear parallel to the plea for more time for the tree, giving it "one more year." (vss. 8-9) The time between Jesus' ministry and the destruction of Jerusalem was more than one year (obviously), and it would be ad hoc to switch from real years for Jesus' ministry to some kind of figurative "one year" for the entire gap between Jesus' crucifixion and the destruction in 70 A.D. ... [More]

Hoaxer or historical witness: The Johannine Dilemma

Comment posted by Lydia on Jan 11, 18:20:

Jesus ascended as recorded in Luke 24 and Acts 1. Rev. 4-5 is a vision of Jesus exalted in heaven, not a fulfillment of Jesus' allusions to the ascension, which took place from the slopes of the Mount of Olives forty days after Jesus' resurrection. ... [More]

Hoaxer or historical witness: The Johannine Dilemma

Comment posted by Lydia on Jan 11, 18:18:

I'm afraid that I totally disagree with that sort of thing about Ezekiel and the number 153. I simply don't have the time to exercise my ingenuity, but I'm firmly convinced that one could exercise similar numerological ingenuity and come up with something that looked significant if the number had been 154 or 103 or whatever. That's how numerology works. That sort of thing is like "seeing" paths in the woods, and I would strongly warn against it. When I play backgammon with my husband (which we often do), w ... [More]

More on ur-source theories vs. undesigned coincidences

Comment posted by Thomas Hamilton on Jan 11, 16:18:

Stumbled across what I take to be an undesigned coincidence the other day between Luke and John- not sure if it's been noted before: (Luke 13:6-7) And he told this parable: "A man had a fig tree planted in his vineyard, and he came seeking fruit on it and found none. And he said to the vinedresser, 'Look, for three years now I have come seeking fruit on this fig tree, and I find none. Cut it down. Why should it use up the ground?' The fig tree obviously signifies Israel, as with the sign of Jesus cursing ... [More]

Hoaxer or historical witness: The Johannine Dilemma

Comment posted by Thomas Hamilton on Jan 11, 16:00:

Lydia, thanks for your great work. I stumbled across this on Google by looking for stuff about John 21 and I just wanted to "push" a little bit on your comment about the 153 fish. Don't mean for this to be overkill, of course, as I write this as much out of my own personal interest as I do as a response to your brief comment above. This also is something of a general pushback to your suspicion of literary-theological devices in general- though I absolutely agree with your critique of most claims of such dev ... [More]

Apple pulls app for Christian ministry

Comment posted by Nice Marmot on Jan 9, 09:50:

"Pretty sure the beginnings of the consumerist (and financial shenanigan) culture preceded the sexual liberation movement by a good half-century if not more." I was implying that they've been intertwined since the Sexual Revolution. But also remember that the advertising industry learned fairly early on that "sex sells." Sexual liberation opened new vistas for the use of sex in advertising, and as the industry had already been pushing the envelope in that direction it was primed and ready to latch onto t ... [More]

Apple pulls app for Christian ministry

Comment posted by Tony on Jan 8, 20:56:

So-called sexual liberation and consumerism are intertwined, Of course they are, because vices generally help each other undermine virtue. But that doesn't mean that they are intertwined at the foundation and theory. Pretty sure the beginnings of the consumerist (and financial shenanigan) culture preceded the sexual liberation movement by a good half-century if not more. And the fact that the demi-gods of of the finance-economy have recognized in sexual license a number of helpful trends to line their ... [More]

Apple pulls app for Christian ministry

Comment posted by Nice Marmot on Jan 8, 06:37:

~~All they did, upon taking charge, was make a pretense of it being "good for corporate America" to undermine sexual normalcy.~~ When has it been otherwise? Corporate America has always been anti-traditional. It's just that right now it's so blatant that even some of the corporate cheerleaders are finally sitting up and taking notice. You can't yell "Have it your way!" for 60 years and not expect cultural repercussions. So-called sexual liberation and consumerism are intertwined, and have been for a long ... [More]

Apple pulls app for Christian ministry

Comment posted by Tony on Jan 7, 11:21:

They really aren't a separate entity from the cultural left. That's what I was going to say. There may be a tiny few corporate moguls who were not educated in the universities, but they are effectively irrelevant. Almost all were trained to be leftists in the wholly-owned subsidiary that is the university system. The hippies of the 60's finally made it to be in charge of corporate America in the 90's, and they never left off their sexual revolution "ideals" in the least. All they did, upon taking charg ... [More]

Apple pulls app for Christian ministry

Comment posted by Lydia on Jan 5, 22:47:

but it took a while for corporate America to fully embrace the cultural revolution of the 60's. And I would say the reasons for that are two-fold. For one thing, much of the silliness of the cultural revolution really was costly, in real-dollar terms. Even forcing (yes, I'm going to say this) women on the workforce has cost something financial in terms of morale and workplace cohesion, loss of efficiency with women's generally less focused approach to work, desire to have children, distractions with childr ... [More]

Apple pulls app for Christian ministry

Comment posted by Nice Marmot on Jan 5, 14:29:

Remember when we use to hear "moderates" or "centrists" describing themselves as "socially liberal but fiscally conservative"? You don't really hear that very much anymore. Not because the species it describes has gone away, but because it's become something like the elites' default position. "which has 'harnessed' which is a chicken and egg problem" Yes and no. The relationship has become symbiotic, but it took a while for corporate America to fully embrace the cultural revolution of the 60's. Of co ... [More]

Apple pulls app for Christian ministry

Comment posted by Lydia on Jan 5, 12:58:

the corporate technocratic right has harnessed the energy of the cultural left for its own purposes. I'd be more inclined to say that the cultural left has harnessed the energy of the corporate technocratic class for *its* own purposes. In fact, not to be crass, but I'm strongly inclined to think that there's a lot of money to be made by being conservative and not being crazy. The trans agenda alone is expensive, and ordinary people don't like it. Family-friendly movies, if well-made, tend to make a lot ... [More]

Apple pulls app for Christian ministry

Comment posted by Nice Marmot on Jan 5, 12:23:

"The o.p. wasn't intended to call for regulation, just to clarify, but rather to serve as the zillionth wake-up call to anyone who is still in doubt of the intentions of the homosexualist left." Augusto Del Noce called this 50 years ago: the corporate technocratic right has harnessed the energy of the cultural left for its own purposes. This explains why corporate America is so "pro-gay," and why the cultural left is willing to give "the 1%" a pass, provided they go along with its agenda. Because of its ... [More]

Apple pulls app for Christian ministry

Comment posted by DR84 on Jan 5, 01:34:

Speaking of actual legal bans on speech (that would in effect also ban particular ministries that necessarily use that speech). There is a what trans activists hope will be a precedent setting case banning "transphobic" speech like "transwomen are not women" in Canada. The case is Oger v Whatcott. Whatcott may not be as sympathetic of a figure as say Jack Phillips, but Oger is one heck of a woman hating bully with an axe to grind. ... [More]

Apple pulls app for Christian ministry

Comment posted by Lydia on Jan 4, 22:32:

Too many Christians today think of the prohibitions against homosexual activity as incomprehensible, black-box rules made by God. Even if they affirm them because God said it, the natural law connection is lost on them. God might as well have said that we are forbidden to eat kidney beans. If he said it clearly and emphatically enough, this type of Christian would accept it, but bemusedly. And it would be hard to get up much enthusiasm for making it clear to kidney bean eaters that they are sinning. ... [More]

Apple pulls app for Christian ministry

Comment posted by Tony on Jan 4, 18:29:

the idea that even just openly stating the truth that their activity is a sin is going to be hurtful, make them feel unloved, and harm our relationships with them. Avoiding *that* is what we are supposed to focus on. It's the most important thing. So let's see how that plays out in another arena: Pre-meditated murder is a sin." No, No! You mustn't say such things! Even just openly stating the truth that their activity is a sin is going to be hurtful, make them feel unloved, and harm our relationship ... [More]

Apple pulls app for Christian ministry

Comment posted by Lydia on Jan 4, 16:45:

The o.p. wasn't intended to call for regulation, just to clarify, but rather to serve as the zillionth wake-up call to anyone who is still in doubt of the intentions of the homosexualist left. I don't think I know enough about the matter to know what regulation to call for, and I'm not sure Facebook's legal incoherence (which I've mentioned) would apply to Apple in the case in the o.p. even if that legal incoherence were disallowed. I also wanted to point out that the activist himself says that he sees App ... [More]

Apple pulls app for Christian ministry

Comment posted by Tony on Jan 4, 15:30:

What's the harm to me if Google bans my website from a search? I have to agree with Lydia here, and it doesn't depend only on the fact that Google's making money off its operation depends on other businesses making money off of their presence in Google's tentacles. If I run a non-profit trying to reach X audience that I think needs my services, the fact that I pay Joe Smartz to design a web-site and pay Little Tech to host it for me (and none of my money goes to Google directly), it matters a heck of a lo ... [More]

Apple pulls app for Christian ministry

Comment posted by Lydia on Jan 4, 13:04:

If Google goes away tomorrow, will the neighborhood pizza joint, auto repair shop, and barber close up shop because no one will be able to find them? It would certainly make things harder. People look up all those local businesses on their phones, etc. Even I at this point hardly ever use a telephone book. I find the phone numbers of all local businesses on the Internet to call them, figure out how to get there, compare prices and services. Especially to read business reviews. I even use Google to shop fo ... [More]

Apple pulls app for Christian ministry

Comment posted by Nice Marmot on Jan 4, 12:44:

"a few megacorporations own all the locks and arbitrarily they decide whose boats go through and whose don't and when challenged they just tell you you are free to take your 1000-foot boat down the many alternative creeks." Big Tech has this tendency towards monopolization baked in. See Jonathan Taplin's Move Fast and Break Things and Franklin Foer's World Without Mind, among others. ... [More]

Apple pulls app for Christian ministry

Comment posted by Jeffrey S. on Jan 4, 12:19:

"It's supposed to be a symbiotic relationship. If businesses couldn't use search engines, and ipso facto the biggest, most popular search engine out there, to make money, they wouldn't have a reason to make web sites!" Again, this is fair...although I'd be curious to see actual data on the subject. What percentage of small businesses rely on Google to bring them sales? Has anyone looked at this question? If Google goes away tomorrow, will the neighborhood pizza joint, auto repair shop, and barber close ... [More]

Apple pulls app for Christian ministry

Comment posted by Scott W. on Jan 4, 12:01:

I tend to look at the internet as a big commercial river in which a few megacorporations own all the locks and arbitrarily they decide whose boats go through and whose don't and when challenged they just tell you you are free to take your 1000-foot boat down the many alternative creeks. ... [More]

Apple pulls app for Christian ministry

Comment posted by Lydia on Jan 4, 11:59:

That is a fair point, but why should anyone have an expectation that Google exists to help them make money? Google exists to help Google make money. Likewise with Apple. Here I'm really going to have to push back, Jeff. Google's search engine *obviously* makes money *because* people use it to make money themselves. It's supposed to be a symbiotic relationship. If businesses couldn't use search engines, and ipso facto the biggest, most popular search engine out there, to make money, they wouldn't have a rea ... [More]

Apple pulls app for Christian ministry

Comment posted by Jeffrey S. on Jan 4, 11:49:

"If you're making money by attracting people to your website, and most of your customers do use Google, then you get fewer hits and fewer customers. Pretty simple." That is a fair point, but why should anyone have an expectation that Google exists to help them make money? Google exists to help Google make money. Likewise with Apple. On the other hand, going back to the question of liability, I'm intrigued with this idea: suppose, for example, you run a auto repair store that advertises on Google and an ... [More]

Apple pulls app for Christian ministry

Comment posted by Nice Marmot on Jan 4, 11:46:

"The question for antitrust economics and law is how does such control hurt consumers" That's A question but not the only question. Look at some of the legislation related to the railroad companies and you'll find that other negative externalities were involved, not just those related to price, as it was perceived that monopolistic practices have further effects downstream. The idea that actual monopolies are "bad," yet moving as legally close to them as possible is "good" seems odd, to say the least. Th ... [More]

Apple pulls app for Christian ministry

Comment posted by Lydia on Jan 4, 10:40:

What's the harm to me if Google bans my website from a search? Well, actually, there could be a lot of harm. If you're making money by attracting people to your website, and most of your customers do use Google, then you get fewer hits and fewer customers. Pretty simple. If you're a writer who gets paid by the page hit, you get less pay. If you're running a ministry and Google bans your website, your message reaches far fewer people, whom your goal was to help via the Internet. Obviously Google's demotin ... [More]

Apple pulls app for Christian ministry

Comment posted by Jeffrey S. on Jan 4, 10:05:

Regarding "antitrust enforcement against the tech giants" -- as the resident 'pro-corporate shill around here, I'll bite and defend big tech. I'm not sure I see the consumer harm from "the largest four smartphone sellers control[ling] 90% of the market." The question for antitrust economics and law is how does such control hurt consumers -- are these smartphone sellers conspiring to unfairly jack up prices? Stifle innovation? Ask yourselves -- have smartphones over the past five to ten years become chea ... [More]