What’s Wrong with the World

The men signed of the cross of Christ go gaily in the dark.

About

What’s Wrong with the World is dedicated to the defense of what remains of Christendom, the civilization made by the men of the Cross of Christ. Athwart two hostile Powers we stand: the Jihad and Liberalism...read more

Recent Comments

"When the Rome Hits Your Eye, That's Amoris"

Comment posted by Sean K. on Jan 18, 00:17:

https://web.archive.org/web/20150909193438/http://www.firstthings.com:80/blogs/mullarkey/2015/05/does-rome-read-aesop I like this line: "It is impossible not to wonder what prompts a priest to pose for the camera in this attitude." ... [More]

"When the Rome Hits Your Eye, That's Amoris"

Comment posted by Tony on Jan 17, 21:26:

UPDATE: Fr. Z connects interesting dots for us in the ongoing saga of Amoris. First, he notes that as whopping as some of the footnotes in Chapter 8 are, perhaps the most telling one is the MISSING footnote. The passage in Amoris, which I quoted part of above, is Saint Thomas Aquinas himself recognized that someone may possess grace and charity, yet not be able to exercise any one of the virtues well; in other words, although someone may possess all the infused moral virtues, he does not clearly manife ... [More]

Come Unto Me, and I Will Give You Rest

Comment posted by Lydia on Jan 17, 20:29:

Thank you, Kristor, for the great comment. One has to find that way, practically, to unite oneself with Christ. Jesus definitely talks about it: "Abide in me, and I in you." "I am the vine, ye are the branches." I wonder if the disciples knew how to do that and, if so, when they figured it out. ... [More]

Come Unto Me, and I Will Give You Rest

Comment posted by Kristor on Jan 17, 19:45:

Lydia, I'm responding here because I keep running into error messages when I try to post the following comment over at Extra Thoughts: Well said, and true enough, all of it. My own interpretation of that text is that when we labor onward alone, under our own steam, we are indeed heavy laden. When we join ourselves to the Body of Christ, by contrast, we find that – no matter how arduous our outward labors – we bear them but lightly, being aided mysteriously at every step. I have experienced this differenc ... [More]

"When the Rome Hits Your Eye, That's Amoris"

Comment posted by Sean K. on Jan 17, 03:01:

Yeah, I've corrected it for some scribal errors: But when Jesus saw it, he was moved with indignation, and said to them, "Allow the little [Lutherans]] to come to [receive communion]! Don't forbid them, for the [eucharist] belongs to such as these." - Mark 10:14 (ICT:HCE, or It's Close Enough Translation: Human Construct Edition) "sincere about their religion" I believe the term is 'spiritual but not religious.' Jesus is still a great guy and all - don't get me wrong. But you've got to relate to him - - ... [More]

"When the Rome Hits Your Eye, That's Amoris"

Comment posted by Tony on Jan 16, 22:40:

And they weren't Lutherans? (Probably a Catholic mistranslation.) Heh, that's great! and pretty soon it seemed as if they gave up a lot - but you'd be mistaken. They are thriving more than at any time in the past (in the same way that a frown is a smile looked at upside down!). You're darn tootin' right! Dwindling numbers in the churches is a GOOD sign, since it means people are being more sincere about their religion, and more of them are out "witnessing" and "accompanying" and "evangelizing" instead ... [More]

"When the Rome Hits Your Eye, That's Amoris"

Comment posted by Sean K. on Jan 16, 19:07:

Would it consubstantiate for me or would it still transubstantiate? Would it be fine if I was part of the ELCA, or would that be going too far. "every sincere person who wants to meet with Jesus should be allowed to, no obstacles" Didn't Jesus chide his disciples for not letting Lutherans from receiving communion? It was children you say? And they weren't Lutherans? (Probably a Catholic mistranslation.) As a rule of thumb, outsiders are much better at understanding things than those who are on the insi ... [More]

"When the Rome Hits Your Eye, That's Amoris"

Comment posted by Tony on Jan 15, 20:33:

I would go so far as to say that even non-catholics should be allowed to have communion, since it is sometimes humanly impossible to be a catholic - or something like that - but I'll have to wait for now on that one. No, no, Sean, you don't have to wait. Lutherans receive Communion at Vatican after meeting with Pope Over at Ed Feser's blog we had non-Catholics telling us that the Catholic sacrament of the Eucharist is essentially "a meeting with Jesus", and every sincere person who wants to meet with ... [More]

"When the Rome Hits Your Eye, That's Amoris"

Comment posted by Sean K. on Jan 15, 11:26:

"This isn't even consistent anarchy in which each man follows his own conscience." Anarchy? You mean tolerance. This approach makes perfect sense. Doesn't 1 Cor 4:5 obligates him not to judge who is worthy of receiving absolution or communion. (Never mind the context or what the passage really means - that shouldn't be too much of an obstacle.) To borrow a page from pro-choicers, specifically their argument that pro-life doctors have to be complicit in others getting an abortion, we see that, since set th ... [More]

"When the Rome Hits Your Eye, That's Amoris"

Comment posted by Lydia on Jan 14, 16:46:

What shocks me a little is the apparent set of orders to the priests. What about the priest's conscience? Why is the conscience of a priest bound to the conscience of the parishioner who is "at peace" with requesting absolution and Communion in such circumstances? This isn't even consistent anarchy in which each man follows his own conscience. It would seem a more consistent reliance on individual, private conscience for the bishops to say that they have no problem with the couple's seeking absolution and C ... [More]

"When the Rome Hits Your Eye, That's Amoris"

Comment posted by Tony on Jan 14, 15:42:

Ugh. The term "disaster" for this is quite right. And this is taking the natural reading of AL standing on its own, I think. It comes down to this: do we join with the innovators who read AL in conformity with the apparent intention of the Pope, or do we join with those who read AL in the hermenuetic of continuity with the entire teaching of the Church, right up to JPII and Benedict (who were no hide-bound reactionaries, not even close). The Pope appears to think that a Catholic man can in good cons ... [More]

"When the Rome Hits Your Eye, That's Amoris"

Comment posted by Lydia on Jan 13, 21:04:

Whoa, according to Ed Peters the Maltese bishops are telling their priests they have to grant the sacrament of absolution to Catholics living as divorced and remarried and continuing to have sex: The Maltese bishops, by extending their document to the sacrament of Reconciliation, have basically instructed their priests not to withhold absolution from divorced-and-remarried Catholics who refuse to repent of their “public and permanent adultery” (CCC 2384) even to the point of abstaining from sexual (nb: sex ... [More]

Classifications of undesigned coincidences

Comment posted by Lydia on Jan 13, 21:00:

does Craig Keener touch on anything like undesigned coincidences in his huge volume on Acts? I have to confess that I haven't read the four-volume work. But I can say that Keener has written a very kind foreword to my book. :-) ... [More]

"When the Rome Hits Your Eye, That's Amoris"

Comment posted by Lydia on Jan 13, 20:58:

If you cannot choose to live spiritually, you will remain dead spiritually. The other day I was talking about something and quoted "O Come, O Come, Emmanuel," where it says, "Make safe the way that leads on high, and close the path to misery." The moral I drew was that in the end there are only two paths--the way that leads on high and the path to misery. You pick one or the other. ... [More]

Classifications of undesigned coincidences

Comment posted by Callum on Jan 13, 20:27:

Really quite crazy when you put it like that. Isn't it ironic that biblical scholars are solely focused on whatever confirmations they can get from secular history - ignoring the type of confirmations between biblical texts - yet it is within of the most important books of the twentieth century regarding confirmations between Acts and secular history that the internal evidence is highlighted! Ever since I read a list of (something around) 80 points of corroboration in Acts from Hemer's book, it's been on ... [More]

"When the Rome Hits Your Eye, That's Amoris"

Comment posted by Tony on Jan 13, 19:30:

Malta bishop: living as brother and sister may be humanly impossible for a couple that does not have a valid marriage. God: being spiritually alive in grace may be spiritually impossible for a couple that lives as married but without actually being married. Outcome: God wins. Or, put another way: do you want to live humanly, or spiritually? Or, Resolution of the "Conundrum": If you cannot live in the same house with a person not your spouse and remain chaste, then don't live in the same house w ... [More]

"When the Rome Hits Your Eye, That's Amoris"

Comment posted by Sean K. on Jan 13, 18:48:

Will Malta be allowing non-Catholics to receive communion soon, too? You know being catholic is sometimes not humanly possible, so it just doesn't seem fair to limit it to only catholics. ... [More]

"When the Rome Hits Your Eye, That's Amoris"

Comment posted by Truth Unites... and Divides on Jan 13, 16:37:

BREAKING: Malta’s bishops allow civilly remarried divorcees to receive Communion o "The Maltese Bishops say the new guidelines ...." o "The Malta Bishops cite AL heavily throughout their document, including passages that are the subject of the dubia submitted by the four cardinals." o "The Archdiocese of Malta and the Diocese of Gozo have directed their parishes to read a letter this Sunday at Mass explaining the new guidelines on interpreting Amoris Laetitia." (To be sung to the tune of Dean Martin' ... [More]

Classifications of undesigned coincidences

Comment posted by Lydia on Jan 13, 16:30:

Callum, I tend to think that almost nobody focuses enough on any of these categories, not even the first three. Probably the nearest would be category 3: That is, people and scholars will ask whether we have another account of a specific event mentioned in Scripture. Does anybody else mention the slaughter of the innocent? Does any secular historian mention the darkness at Christ's death? And so forth. And then they'll make an argument from silence if we can't come up with one. Even then, the idea isn't to ... [More]

"When the Rome Hits Your Eye, That's Amoris"

Comment posted by Lydia on Jan 13, 15:54:

It seems fairly obvious to me that the Pope *does* want this sort of thing applied in millions of cases, including those that otherwise have every external appearance of validity in Catholic terms. I'm afraid that from a practical perspective making a bunch of new juridical rules that state that there is no presumption of validity in various swathes of cases is only going to "feed the beast" in the sense of giving an inch to those who want to take a mile. I realize that I'm speaking politically here more th ... [More]

Classifications of undesigned coincidences

Comment posted by Callum on Jan 13, 15:53:

The book is added to my list - now Lydia mcgrew is going to flesh out undesigned coincidences within probability theory?! Interested in your work as always Lydia! In a general sense, would modern biblical studies be focused on the first 3 categories (though not using UC as criteria) in terms of trying to find specific events which have evidence for them without assuming anything about the general reliability of the source? If so, it shows how modern biblical studies misses the forest for the trees. Quite o ... [More]

"When the Rome Hits Your Eye, That's Amoris"

Comment posted by Tony on Jan 13, 12:49:

I want to highlight a contrast that is critical to what is going on here. I said, on the one hand: Hence, so far as I understand the historical position of the Church, (which I might not) it seems impossible for the Church to effectively say, for example, that each couple can marry without the Church's institutional involvement, for doing so would dissociate the sacramental order from the Church's jurisdiction. On the other hand, Card. Müller says: In this context, the Pope refers to the “individu ... [More]

"When the Rome Hits Your Eye, That's Amoris"

Comment posted by Tony on Jan 13, 10:45:

Lydia, I see what had you thinking in this direction. This interview with Cardinal Müller: http://www.onepeterfive.com/cardinal-gerhard-muller-will-no-correction-pope-no-danger-faith/ Cardinal Müller even said that he was surprised that the Letter of the Four Cardinals to the pope – containing the dubia concerning Amoris Laetitia – had been published. “I do not like that,” he added. In Müller’s eyes, it is not at all appropriate “almost to force the pope to answer with ‘yes’ or ‘no’” with regard to the ... [More]

"When the Rome Hits Your Eye, That's Amoris"

Comment posted by Lydia on Jan 12, 09:20:

Ah, having done a little more research, I see that Cardinal Muller, who said that no fraternal correction will take place, is not one of the people actually carrying out the process and is merely giving his opinion. I had mistakenly thought it was some kind of definite statement that those who issued the dubia were dropping the matter, but I was wrong. ... [More]

"When the Rome Hits Your Eye, That's Amoris"

Comment posted by Tony on Jan 12, 04:55:

a) that Francis *wants* to throw out the earlier Church teachings on divorce and remarriage and Communion (fairly wholesale), If I had to bet one way or the other, I could not summon enough evidence to make me happy betting against this position. But since I don't have to bet on this, I prefer to use reticence about direct inferences like this. That is to say, I refuse to draw as definite a conclusion as this. I am willing to say, however, that the documents he issues are loaded with unclarity, and peop ... [More]

In praise of stigma

Comment posted by Sean K. on Jan 11, 18:12:

We can turn Peter Singer against himself by getting enough people to prefer him to be stranded on some isolated island. https://www.change.org/p/the-majority-of-people-with-preferences-lock-peter-singer-up ... [More]

"When the Rome Hits Your Eye, That's Amoris"

Comment posted by Lydia on Jan 11, 16:57:

Tony, I hope this is not too harsh to say in this public forum, esp. from a Protestant, but my strong impression is a) that Francis *wants* to throw out the earlier Church teachings on divorce and remarriage and Communion (fairly wholesale), though he does not try to do so using authoritative formulae and b) that Francis is positively *hostile* to the rigor, internal consistency, and clarity that are hallmarks of traditional Catholic teaching. If these are true, then it is not surprising that he sows co ... [More]

Classifications of undesigned coincidences

Comment posted by rockingwithhawking on Jan 11, 04:59:

For one thing, it's useful for geeky types Hey, I resent being called out like this! Just kidding. Fine work, as usual. :-) ... [More]

"When the Rome Hits Your Eye, That's Amoris"

Comment posted by Tony on Jan 10, 19:30:

Heh. A kind of Contra proferentem with Pope Francis being the offerer and the deposit of faith the promisee. Scott, that's a great comparison. I particularly loved this line in the linked article: The reasoning behind this rule is to encourage the drafter of a contract to be as clear and explicit as possible and to take into account as many foreseeable situations as it can. Yes, the push SHOULD be to get the draftsman to be as clear and explicit as possible. Francis needs to recognize the difference ... [More]

"When the Rome Hits Your Eye, That's Amoris"

Comment posted by Tony on Jan 10, 19:16:

Truth, and Paul, thanks. We aim to amuse when we cannot enlighten. It's a bonus when we can do both, right? Chicken, you are absolutely right that an irregular marital situation cannot generally be fixed in the internal forum, with the couple and the parish priest. If I gave the impression that I was aiming in that direction, I am sorry, and I take it back. What I meant to imply was a couple and their parish priest working out in the internal forum a settled conclusion on such matters as "we have bee ... [More]

"When the Rome Hits Your Eye, That's Amoris"

Comment posted by Paul J Cella on Jan 10, 16:16:

Yup, that's an early entrant for Headline of the Year, Tony. ... [More]

"When the Rome Hits Your Eye, That's Amoris"

Comment posted by Truth Unites... and Divides on Jan 10, 14:45:

"When the Rome Hits Your Eye, That's Amoris" [To be sung to the tune of Dean Martin's "That's amore."] LOL, I actually sung the Title Line to the tune, and it just cracked me up big time. It's so farcially silly. I broke out laughing. This has got to be one of the best titles for a blog post ever! P.S. Great post too. ... [More]

"When the Rome Hits Your Eye, That's Amoris"

Comment posted by The Masked Chicken on Jan 10, 09:54:

My comment about the internal forum went into moderation because I included a couple of links. It is important to understand why a priest, acting alone, cannot pronounce a marriage null and if he cannot, then he cannot pronounce there being no sin. I hope the comment gets pulled from moderation. The Chicken ... [More]

"When the Rome Hits Your Eye, That's Amoris"

Comment posted by The Masked Chicken on Jan 10, 09:51:

Dear Tony, A very thoughtful post. One thing I do want to point out, however, is that simply presenting one's case to a parish priest does NOT satisfy the Canonical requirements for discernment of moral culpability or nullity. These cases cannot be decided in the internal forum, because marriage, being a public act, requires a public declaration for its nullity. The renown canonist, Ed Peters, has written extensively on this. See, here: https://canonlawblog.wordpress.com/2017/01/07/is-kellers-essay-re ... [More]

"When the Rome Hits Your Eye, That's Amoris"

Comment posted by Scott W. on Jan 10, 07:12:

Hence, in any passage that is seemingly ambiguous, or even at first glance seemingly at odds with earlier Church teaching, you have to read it in such a way as to conform to the earlier. You have to resolve ambiguities in favor of the extant Church teaching Heh. A kind of Contra proferentem with Pope Francis being the offerer and the deposit of faith the promisee. ... [More]

Classifications of undesigned coincidences

Comment posted by Elizabeth Johnston on Jan 10, 07:08:

I find your work interesting and have preordered your book. The "undesigned coincidence" in my daily life is that I have been looking at way historians verify things. My particular interest is biblical, but obviously, it would apply to anything in the past. Here is a gem from Isaac Taylor, History of the Transmission of Ancient Books to Modern Times: Together with the Process of Historical Proof, New Edition, Revised & Enlarged. (London, England: Jackson and Walford, 1859), pp. 225-226. Very few facts of i ... [More]

Elizabeth Goudge's novels

Comment posted by JAnice Fielke on Jan 9, 18:33:

I have just finished reading "The Herb Of Grace" I loved it. THe characters were wonderful, The story brilliant. To see the subtle changes in their attitudes as the different families mixed together and became friends . How different personalities were drawn And how love developed between them. THe actual herb of Grace is Rue a Biblicsl Herb , it is quite bitter I loved the Grace of God overriding the bitterness in their lives and it was great to have a happy ending. I recommend this book Lovely. ... [More]

Is Jahi McMath breathing on her own?

Comment posted by Lydia on Jan 9, 12:02:

Yeah, actually, it matters to a lot more than lawyers whether a person is actually alive or dead! All this ranting about this "complete horror show" etc. just shows us the danger of exactly this kind of thinking: If you have a bad quality of life, we want you to die for your own sake. So we'll just hope that your mother will accept that you are dead, even if it isn't true (!), because you'd be better off dead anyway. Nuh-uh. Decisions should be based on the truth, not on better-off-dead sentiment. ... [More]

Is Jahi McMath breathing on her own?

Comment posted by Nancy on Jan 9, 10:45:

Splitting hairs as to what exact microamount of brain stem activity is necessary to disqualify someone as "brain dead" is something that the lawyers can engage in; it is not something that should be relevant to those who love her. I believe that Jahi's mother loves her, but she is in denial and, as another commenter noted, surrounded by enablers. The question is not "can Jahi occasionally add one breath a minute over what the vent does for her?" The real question is -- why would a loving mother want to ... [More]

Marriage-mindedness

Comment posted by Lydia on Jan 9, 09:36:

I was thinking something to the effect that an unmarried person will naturally (if things are going well) be close to his own parents and will think of "my family" as the family he grew up in. This is a good and healthy thing. But as the single person gets older, if he does not make a family of his own, then he isn't continuing the chain of families. The only "my family" is his parents and/or siblings, cousins, etc. He isn't, as it were, adding to the stock of families in the world or making sure that the n ... [More]